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Course Guide

01002E14 / 0100EG24 / 01002E34 / 01002E44 

NEW

2 credits  |  10  |

Prerequisite: English 9

College Credit Available

Develop and practice the skills in research, collaboration, and communication that you’ll need in any academic discipline. You’ll investigate topics in a variety of subject areas, write research-based essays, and design and give presentations both individually and as part of a team. AP Seminar is a 2 credit, yearlong course that meets every other day for the full school year. 

Notes: Students will take US History on the opposite days of AP Seminar. These courses are not co-taught/interdisciplinary. Students register for US History as usual (no need to register for an every other day version). If students are interested in taking AP Seminar & AP US History, they should consult with their counselor.

NEW

05176E12 

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Minimum of one art class in painting or drawing. Interested students should submit images of 4 ambitious artworks with a written statement of interest to the art department for review.

This semester length course is for advanced art students interested in building and showcasing their technical and creative skillset. It will focus on building a portfolio of 5 final artworks, and 15 examples from daily artist sketchbook exercises, to be submitted to the College Board for potential college credit. Unlike other AP courses, in place of a written exam, an extensive portfolio is submitted.
 
Students in grades 10-12 who wish to continue their painting, or drawing, practice and to engage in more advanced projects should take this class. Students are expected to plan, schedule and execute independent projects that demonstrate an advanced level of inquiry, research, craft and technique using the medium of their choice.

In AP 2D ART, attention is placed on technical excellence and compositional accuity.  Students are assisted in developing personalized artworks. Painting and Drawing styles are explored according to each student’s interests and needs. Issues of art criticism and evaluation help students gain a better understanding of what happens in the creative process.
 

NEW

05176E22 

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Digital Art I. Interested students should submit images of 4 ambitious artworks with a written statement of interest to the art department for review.

Note: This is a semester course.

This course is for advanced art students interested in building and showcasing their technical and creative skillset. It will focus on building a portfolio of 5 final artworks and 15 examples from daily artist sketchbook exercises to be submitted to the College Board for potential college credit. Unlike other AP courses, in place of a written exam, an extensive portfolio is submitted.

Students in grades 10-12 who wish to continue their Digital art practice and to engage in more advanced digital projects should take this class. Students are expected to plan, schedule and execute independent projects that demonstrate an advanced level of inquiry, research, craft and technique using the digital tools of their choice.

In AP STUDIO DIGITAL ART, attention is placed on technical excellence and compositional acuity. Students are assisted in developing personalized artworks. Digital styles are explored according to each student’s interests and needs. Issues of art criticism and evaluation help students gain a better understanding of what happens in the creative process.

NEW

05172E11 

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Ceramics I. Interested students should submit images of 4 ambitious artworks with a written statement of interest to the art department for review.

Note: This is a semester course.

This course is for advanced art students interested in building and showcasing their technical and creative skillset. It will focus on building a portfolio of 5 final artworks and 15 examples from daily artist sketchbook exercises to be submitted to the College Board for potential college credit. Unlike other AP courses, in place of a written exam, an extensive portfolio is submitted.

In AP 3D ART attention is placed on technical excellence and composition acuity. Students are assisted in developing more personalized sculptures. Sculpture styles are explored according to each student’s interests and needs. Issues of art criticism and evaluation help students gain a better understanding of what happens in the creative process. 

Students in grades 10-12 who wish to continue their sculpture practice and to engage in  more advanced sculptural projects should take this class. Students are expected to plan, schedule and execute independent projects that demonstrate an advanced level of inquiry, research, craft and technique using the sculptural medium of their choice.

05159E33

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Ceramics II or Instructor Permission

In this course students will continue developing the skills of the potter’s wheel as well as hand building techniques. If run during the 4th term, additional outdoor firings such as raku and horse hair firings will take place. This course can be taken more than once.

05159G13

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Clay is one of the earth’s most abundant materials. It has been used by people for thousands of years, for a multitude of artistic and utilitarian products. This course introduces ceramic materials for both pottery and sculpture. Pottery will be made on the potter’s wheel and by hand building methods. A variety of methods can be used to create sculptures. Many aspects of artistic expression will be explored. This course is ideal for the student who wants to pursue a focused ceramic studio experience.

05159G23

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Ceramics I

This course is a continuation of Ceramics I, with a greater emphasis on individual development of artistic expression and craftsmanship. Students may wish to develop greater skill or explore a particular segment of the field in more depth.

05162G12

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Photo-manipulation, digital painting and illustration are the three methods of creating digital images we see in the media today. Photo-manipulation will be the major focus in this class using Photoshop, Illustrator and Painter. We will experiment with expressing ideas and themes visually, combining and collaging photos, and discussing some issues generated by these new technologies such as “Digital Truth.” Students will learn the wide range of techniques these programs offer for expressing ideas visually. Students will also work with digital cameras and scanners to develop a unique style of images and manipulate them to produce a variety of dynamic digital artworks.

05162G22

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Digital Art I or Instructor Permission

In this class, students will learn digital illustration techniques using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator software. In the second half of the course, students will learn how to create motion graphics and animations using Image Ready and Adobe Flash software.

05156G13

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course is geared towards students who are either new to drawing or who want to deepen their drawing skills. The course will start with skill building exercises and will end with two large choice drawing projects. Students will be encouraged to develop their drawing skills as well as to draw from their own artistic and personal interests.

05156G23

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Drawing I

Students in grades 10-12 who wish to continue their drawing practice and to experience more advanced drawing projects should take this class.

05166G12

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course is for students who want to design and handcraft jewelry. The materials for jewelry are endless and may include acrylic, wire, fiber, recycled materials, natural materials, and found-objects.

05157G13

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Students who wish to become familiar with the basics of painting should take this class. Color theory, color mixing, gradation, and other painting techniques will be reviewed and practiced. Projects will be a combination of skill building and student designed projects.

05157G23

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Painting I

Students in grades 10-12 who wish to continue their painting practice and to experience more advanced painting projects should take this class.

05158G12

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This class is designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of sculpture including tools, materials, techniques and history. The media to be explored include wood, cardboard, foamcore, modeling clay and stone. Each of the 3 major projects will be introduced within the context of sculpture history. The physical properties of each sculpture material, as well as its design attributes, will be investigated during a rough-draft process in order to prepare students for their final rendition. This course is ideal for students who want to pursue a focused 3D studio experience.

05158G22

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Sculpture I

In Sculpture II, more attention is placed on technical excellence and problems of composition. Students are assisted in developing more personalized sculptures. Sculpture styles are explored according to each student’s interests and needs. Issues of art criticism and evaluation help students gain a better understanding of what happens in the creative process.

05154G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to studio arts for students who want to work with a broad range of art materials. Students will have the opportunity to design a logo, learn some drawing basics, bead on a bead loom, “yarn-bombing”, and work with watercolor and printmaking.

10003G11B / 10003G11PO / 10003G11TC / 10003G11MC

1 credit/semester  |  9  |

Prerequisite: Must be concurrently enrolled in a 9th grade Music course all year

Note: Fulfills EPHS Technology graduation requirement.

Because EPHS music ensembles meet for half of a block period every day, students have two options for how their time opposite an ensemble is spent.  The first option is the “Open Option,” where students have an open half to catch up on homework in the commons or Media Center (students do not need to register for an “Open” half).  The second option is the “Skinny Option,” where students can take Intro to Technology for one semester, opposite of 9th Grade Music Course.  Students must be enrolled in 9th Grade Music all year in order to take the Intro to Technology Skinny concurrently with the ensemble.  This will allow 9th grade music students to carry more credits during their freshman year. (Registrations will be limited based on class size.) If a student would like to choose the “Skinny Option,” use the appropriate skinny course number (see below) in addition to the 9th Grade Music Course registration numbers.

10003G11B (9th Grade Band)
10003G11PO (9th Grade Orchestra)
10003G11TC (9th Grade Treble Choir)
10003G11MC (9th Grade Men’s Chorus)

12104G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Accounting is a prerequisite for Advanced Accounting and for Entrepreneurship

Articulated College Credit Available

The world of business surrounds us and accounting is the language spoken in the world of business.This introductory course is designed for everyone. Working with sample service businesses, you will discover how a business operates to make a profit.  Accounting graduates are in demand with projected job growth of 10% from 2018-2026 - faster than the average for all occupations. (Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook). This course is a must for students interested in a business degree after high school. 

12104G22

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Accounting

Concurrent College Credit Available

Advanced Accounting is an interactive class that follows more in-depth accounting skills and builds off previous knowledge in accounting. It will introduce students to financial information needed in all business-related occupations. Students will learn about the operations and accounting work of a merchandising business including purchases, returns, and inventory.  Students will learn how to account for payroll, payroll taxes and business income taxes while still working with the Accounting Cycle learned in Accounting 1. For those students who plan to pursue a degree in accounting or a business-related field, Advanced Accounting provides students a foundation to support future advanced coursework.

12164E11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Marketing Strategies

Advanced Marketing is a project oriented class involving marketing research, strategy development, and business presentations. You will collaborate with a team to research and develop a solution for a local business. This experience provides you the opportunity to network and polish your written and oral communication skills which are essential in every career.

This class is highly recommended for DECA competitors as you may complete the following written projects in this class: Business Operations Research or Integrated Marketing Campaigns.

04205E11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Algebra II

Note: Fulfills the EPHS Econ/Social Studies and Business graduation requirement. Take AP Exam for College Credit.

AP Economics is a semester-long, two-credit course combining AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics, preparing students for both AP exams. It offers students a more immersive and expansive economics experience and the opportunity to engage in class community over a semester. The course focuses on the decision making of individuals, businesses, and the government.

Students will study a variety of economic theories and issues, analyze their practical application to the real world, and improve their personal, professional, and civic decision-making skills. Particular emphasis is placed on the operation of product and factor markets; distributions of income; market failure; the role of government in promoting efficiency, equity, and growth in the economy; gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation determination; fiscal and monetary policies; and international trade and foreign exchange markets. This course may be taught by any combination of Social Studies and/or Business teachers.

04203E11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Algebra II

Note: Fulfills the EPHS Econ/Social Studies and Business graduation requirement. Take AP Exam for College Credit

Learn about the most applied type of economics from a business perspective that will best prepare you for the economic decisions you will make in your career and as a consumer. If you are considering majoring in Business or Economics in college, this course is a must for you!

Apply cost-benefit analysis to real-world examples that will have the greatest benefit for consumer choices and business pricing and production strategies. Analyze how profit and efficiency differ between market structures and how these strategies influence consumer behavior. Other key topics include supply and demand, government control of markets, elasticity, costs of production, and market failure. Historically, EPHS AP Micro students’ scores are well above the national average and among the top results for EPHS AP courses. 

10005G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Marketing Strategies

Note: This course meets one of the prerequisites for Entrepreneurship: Launching an innovative Social, Non-Profit, or For-Profit Business.

The course uses fun, hands-on activities to stimulate innovative thinking. Whether your career path is in engineering, healthcare, political science, business, or the trades, an innovative mindset is critical for your success! Innovation helps people create and improve processes, products, services, and experiences for their customers, clients or patients. Innovative thinkers see the world differently, noticing problems others have overlooked and using passion, creativity and business skills to craft new and better solutions addressing those problems effectively and sustainably. Students will develop a product or service meeting a need in the community.

12051G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: None

Take a look at business in a changing world by exploring companies like Apple, Amazon, and Target. From economics to marketing to the stock market, entrepreneurship and international business, students will be introduced to each of the many important and exciting facets of business practices. The course is designed to help students determine their interest level in business and to gain an insight to various career opportunities. Speakers will enhance the course content.

NEW

12999G11 

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: None

Utilize your Spanish language skills while exploring business in a changing world. From economics and marketing to the stock market and entrepreneurship, students will be introduced to each of these many important and exciting facets of business practices. Special consideration for business practices in Spanish-speaking countries will accompany all topics. The course is designed for Spanish speakers and immersion students utilize their skills while determining their interest level in a business career. The course will be taught using a combination of Spanish and English. Students will be encouraged to complete all projects in Spanish.

12054G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Are you curious about the law and how it is intertwined with ethics and its effect on businesses and the world around you? This course provides an overview of law and ethics as it pertains to business and personal dealings. Topics include an overview of the American legal system, general contract law in cases such as business and sports contracts, intellectual property, employment and media law, and various forms of business organizations. Students will evaluate law by analyzing past and current legal cases along with the ethical implications.

23151G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: None

Start exploring careers and post-secondary options NOW so you can pick the high school courses that align with your goals! The Start exploring careers and post-secondary options NOW so you can pick the high school courses that align with your goals! The Careers 9/10 class covers the curriculum of the Careers 11/12 course but encompasses both high school and post-secondary planning. Post-secondary options are explored with a broad approach rather than a targeted approach that is more appropriate for juniors and seniors.  Complete career inventories, explore many careers, learn about different educational options after high school, and learn professional skills that will support your success in high school classes and any career. Meet in small groups with 15+ professionals to learn first-hand about their careers at the weekly Career Roundtables.

23154G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Enroll in Careers 11/12 only if you have not taken Careers 9/10. It is strongly recommended to take this course as a junior.

College is an expensive place to do career exploration! To be successful in your career decision-making process, you need to know your options and have an idea what you need to be successful in that career. By completing career inventories and talking with experts in the field, you will develop a comprehensive career plan. You will explore careers, options for further education, and learn professional skills that will support your success in any career. Meet in small groups with 15+ professionals to learn first-hand about their careers at the weekly Career Roundtables.

12053G12 / 12053G22

2 credits  |  12  |

Prerequisites: Accounting & Business Innovations

Articulated College Credit Available

Entrepreneurship is a way of thinking and acting in a diverse world that creates a positive impact through the development of new and better solutions to customer and societal problems. Entrepreneurs create value for others and advance the common good, whether in a startup enterprise, an established company, or in a social-impact enterprise. Students will form partnerships to operate profit driven or non-profit businesses during the term. Each student business will be responsible for developing marketing plans, managing finances, and using data to evaluate business performance. Students will learn from a diverse group of entrepreneurs who provide differing perspectives on the business development process and local opportunities for funding.

NEW

12107G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Personal Financial Management

Are you ready to take the next step to being a confident investor for yourself and others?  Did you ever wonder how organizations obtain and manage financial resources? In Finance and Investing, you’ll learn how to build, analyze, and manage an investment portfolio along with an introduction to corporate finance. Build off the investment knowledge you gained from Personal Financial Management for stocks, mutual funds, investing for retirement, and culturally responsive investment strategies. Examine the tradeoff between risk and return and how it relates to building the optimal investment portfolio. Problem-solving and decision-making skills will be utilized to build your own investment portfolio and to explore career options in finance, such as an investment banker, financial planner, or areas of corporate finance. Students will also explore the world of organizational finance to learn how all types of organizations obtain and manage resources.

10003G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Fulfills the EPHS Technology Graduation Requirement

In today’s digital world, the ability to work with technology is vital. Students will learn how to evaluate the accuracy, perspective, credibility and relevance of online information as well as demonstrate how to give credit to online content creators. Multiple open source programs as well as social media use will be explored while emphasizing the essential 21st century skills of critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, and communication.

10003G11BL

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Fulfills the EPHS Technology Graduation Requirement

In today’s digital world, the ability to work with technology is vital.  Students will learn how to evaluate the accuracy, perspective, credibility and relevance of online information as well as demonstrate how to give credit to online content creators. Multiple open source programs as well as social media use will be explored while emphasizing the essential 21st century skills of critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, and communication.

Note: Blended / Hybrid courses are designed and delivered by EPHS staff. They offer a mix of face to face and online instruction. Course content has elements of student control over time, place, path and/or pace with the goal of affording each student a more personalized learning experience.

10003B11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral by case manager

Note: Fulfills the EPHS Technology Graduation Requirement

Students will learn how to use the EPHS computer system, develop proper keyboarding technique, and use the most common types of software applications.  Students will create word processing documents and will be introduced to spreadsheet and PowerPoint units. This course is designed for students who need additional time to master technique and formatting.

12005G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Articulated College Credit Available

Want to get your homework done faster and improve the quality? If you type less than 35 wpm and/or need improvement in keyboarding skills you should take this course. Emphasis will be placed on skill development including speed, accuracy and technique. Students will develop business communication skills including composing and proofreading while preparing e-mails, letters, reports and tables.

12152G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Marketing is a prerequisite for joining DECA.

You will be introduced to the exciting world of marketing by analyzing real-world business situations. You can enhance your communication skills through selling strategies and will use social media to create a promotional campaign. Professional sales and marketing skills give engineers, doctors, lawyers, and, of course, business professionals a dynamic advantage in today’s competitive marketplace!

12007G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Be prepared for “adulting” by managing your personal finances through engaging activities relevant to your life now and in the future. Topics include: how to invest your money, managing checking & savings accounts, preparing your taxes, managing a budget, maintaining strong credit, and analyzing insurance cases.

12152G12 / 12152G22 / 12995G14 / 12995G24

4 credits  |  12  |

Note: You must register for all 4 numbers.

Get a head start on planning for your future by participating in the Senior Intern Program. You will complete in-depth personality and interest assessments to learn how your strengths match to careers and then you will learn how to network with people in industry to explore all types of options. The skills you learn and practice in interviewing ensure you are able to secure the positions for which you’re applying. You will have the opportunity to do informational interviews, job shadows, and internships in any career area you would like to explore. This includes everything from opportunities in health sciences, political science, business, the trades, engineering, law, natural resources, entrepreneurship, arts, and communication to emerging opportunities as well. Your time in the Senior Intern Program is very individualized and experiential.

10004A11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Articulated College Credit Available

Excel is perhaps the most important software program used in the workplace today, and you will have a strong competitive advantage in college and the workplace by taking this class! Learn how Excel makes it easy to create formulas and functions to get significant meaning out of numbers in a spreadsheet. Work with pivot tables, use lookup functions, and create charts and graphs along with various other worksheet enhancements to make your data work magic. Learn how Access can help you better manage and organize data through the use of tables, advanced queries, and reports in a relational database.

05055G12

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course meets a Fine Arts requirement

The principles and responsibilities of the actor are studied in this course. Important acting skills such as voice, diction, concentration, and emotional recall will be studied as approaches to creating a character. Technical elements of theatrical production as well as the history of drama are also covered. Therefore, each student needs a true desire to learn technique through active participation, presentation, and written work. A final class performance open to the public is the culminating activity. Memorization is required and techniques of memorization are taught as students develop one monologue, a duo scene, and a group scene.

05055E22

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Acting and Theatre Arts or Instructor Approval

Note: This course meets a Fine Arts requirement

This course is designed for those students who wish to work in-depth on characterization using monologue, scene, improvisation, film and other forms of dramatic performance. Students will also read and analyze several plays representing at least three distinct eras in theatre history. Students will develop the independence and confidence essential in creating a characterization both through class/workshop-style activities and a culminating public performance.

11051E14 / 11051E24 / 11051E34 / 11051E44

1 credit/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Introduction to Broadcast Journalism and/or application

Note: This course meets a Fine Arts requirement. Students should register for at least two terms, but are encouraged to sign up for the entire year.

The Eagle News Network (ENN) produces the ENN show, Eyrie magazine, and the ENN website to inform the EPHS community of events and activities in an accurate and entertaining way. This student-led course is for students with an interest in and commitment to journalism who thrive on independent initiative and work well in high-pressure situations. Learn and hone general reporting skills such as interviewing and storytelling, as well as skills related to producing ENN media. The ability to work with a variety of people is essential for success in ENN. Students enrolled in this course have access to Adobe Creative Cloud editing software.

11104E14 / 11104E24 / 11104E34 / 11104E44

1 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Application

Note: This course meets a Fine Arts requirement. Students should register for at least two terms, but are encouraged to sign up for the entire year.

This is a hands-on class for students with school pride who will take on the rewarding task of creating the school's yearbook. Students must be self-motivated, creative, and dedicated to thoroughly reporting a year in the life of EPHS. Learn and apply journalistic writing, design and photography skills while working as part of a student-directed team. Applications can be found on the EPHS website.

01005E11

2 credits  |  11  |

Prerequisite: English 9 and 10 or equivalent

College Credit Available

Note: Summer reading is required

This course will focus on skills and literature taught in the eleventh grade curriculum, but students will learn at an accelerated pace, read more texts, and write more frequently. This course uses Advanced Placement (AP) curriculum related to rhetoric and persuasion with an emphasis on non-fiction texts. Students will prepare for the Advanced Placement Language and Composition test in the spring, but the writing skills are also well aligned with general college readiness. This class is recommended for students with strong reading and writing skills and a desire to engage in analysis and discussion of demanding literary and non-fiction texts.

Students must be willing to strengthen their writing skills through rigorous evaluation and investment in the writing and revision process. The Advanced Placement Language and Composition course is highly regarded by colleges because of the skills students build in critical thinking, close reading, and effective writing.

01006E11

2 credits  |  12  |

Prerequisite: English 9, 10, 11 or equivalent; Completion of an information packet and required summer reading.

Note: An “A” average in Honors English 11 or AP English 11: Language & Composition is highly recommended. Summer reading is required.

College Credit Available

This course is designed to challenge the highly-motivated college bound student who has been successful in prior writing and literature classes. Students should already have a mastery of writing mechanics, sentence structure, and research skills. The course emphasizes discussion, leadership, class participation, creativity, and English academic excellence. Preparation for college writing and literature classes is achieved through intensive practice of expository and creative writing styles, including literary analysis. Students will read classical and modern poetry as well as major British works. Students will be required to do extensive reading and critical analyses as well as tests in the same format as the AP English Literature and Composition exam offered each May. On the basis of performance on the exams, students may be granted college credit and/or advanced placement at a college or university’s discretion.

01104G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of English 9 or equivalent

Note: This course meets a Fine Arts requirement

This writing course is for sophomores, juniors, and seniors interested in studying the creative process and applying their own creative abilities. Writing experiences may include the following: poetry, short stories, film and scriptwriting, or original storytelling. The course demands a commitment to writing, revising, and sharing work as well as a willingness to use
one’s imagination.

01062G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

With a focus on student selection of texts and small-group discussion around student directed areas of interest, students in this class will examine topics and themes in literature that they choose to read utilizing a "book club" format.

01001G14 / 01001G24 / 01001G34 / 01001G44

4 credits  |  9  |

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation

Students will write in a variety of formats and for a variety of audiences, read and view fiction and nonfiction works critically, speak informally and formally, and study for mastery of grammar usage and mechanics of English. In addition to focusing on the agreed upon Essential Learning Targets for English 9 and the standards established by the state, this class will provide reading and writing strategies and skills, time to complete work and practice skills in class, opportunity for individualized attention, and a review of basic grammar usage and punctuation.

01001G12 / 01001G22

2 credits |  9  |

Prerequisite: None

Students will write in a variety of formats and for a variety of audiences, read and view fiction and nonfiction works critically, speak informally and formally, and study for mastery of the grammar and mechanics of English.  This course will focus on agreed upon Essential Learning Targets for English 9 and the standards established by the state.

01002G14 / 01002G24 / 01002G34 / 01002G44

4 credits  |  10  |

Prerequisite: English 9 or equivalent and Teacher Recommendation

Students will write in a variety of formats and for a variety of audiences, read and view fiction and nonfiction works critically, speak informally and formally, and review mechanics of English.  In addition to focusing on the agreed upon Essential Learning Targets for English 10 and the standards established by the state, this class will provide reading and writing strategies and skills, time to complete work and practice skills in class, opportunity for individualized attention, and a review of basic grammar and punctuation.

01002G12 / 01002G22

2 credits  |  10  |

Prerequisite: English 9 or equivalent

Students will write in a variety of formats and for a variety of audiences, read and view fiction and nonfiction works critically, speak informally and formally, and review mechanics of English. This course will focus on agreed upon Essential Learning Targets for English 10 and the standards established by the state.

01003G12 / 01003G22

2 credits  |  11  |

Prerequisite: English 9 and 10 or equivalent

This course will focus on eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth century foundational works of American literature including Native American and other cultures' texts.  Students will conduct short as well as more sustained research projects and write a research paper, engage in collaborative discussions on literature and writing, and develop vocabulary for college and career readiness.

01004G12 / 01004G22

2 credits  |  12  |

Prerequisite: English 9, 10, and 11 or equivalent

This course will focus on foundational works from cultures around the world. Students will write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences including argumentatively to support a claim. Students will also engage in collaborative discussions on literature and writing and make use of digital media to publish and share their work with an audience.

11056G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Students in this course will analyze and study the languages and developments in film. Students enrolled in this course will better understand how movies are constructed and appreciate the criteria necessary to make a film. This course covers the units of cinematic techniques, the impacts of editing, narrative in film, genres, screenplay development, ethics, production considerations, and auteur theory. This course will focus on the skills of viewing, writing, critical thinking, and development of creativity. Many films viewed in class are rated “R”.

01001E12 / 01001E22

2 credits  |  9  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Summer reading is required.

This course will focus on agreed upon Essential Learning Targets for English 9 and the standards established by the state.  Compared to the ninth grade English program, the class will move at an accelerated pace and extend or replace the educational offering of the regular class, emphasize critical thinking skills, require outside reading, read demanding literature, and focus on writing style and voice through various academic writing assignments.

01002E12 / 01002E22

2 credits  |  10  |

Prerequisite: English 9 or equivalent

Note: Summer reading is required.

This course will focus on agreed upon Essential Learning Targets for English 10 and the standards established by the state.  The class will move at an accelerated pace and extend or replace course materials of English 10, emphasize critical thinking skills, require outside reading, read demanding literature, and focus on writing style and voice through various academic writing assignments.

01003E11

2 credits  |  11  |

Prerequisite: English 9 and 10 or equivalent

Note: Summer reading is required.

Compared to the English 11 course, this course will include material studied at a deeper level, focusing on themes, universal connections, and literary lenses, move at an accelerated pace, emphasize high level thinking skills, require more reading outside of class, require reading of demanding literature, and focus on writing style and voice through various academic writing assignments.

01053E11

2 credits  |  12  |

Prerequisite: English 9, 10, 11 or equivalent

Note: Summer reading is required.

This is a course designed for the college-bound 12th grade student. The humanities component will involve studying how intellectual and cultural forces shape the literature, art, music, science, philosophy, and history of the Classical Era to the Middle Ages to the 21st century. In addition to utilizing an interdisciplinary, multi-media approach to studying the arts, architecture, and music of an era, students will read extensively in major works drawn from world and British literature. Students will compose a variety of academic writing assignments, including both an argumentative and a literary analysis paper.

01004E11

2 credits  |  12  |

Prerequisite: English 9, 10, 11 or equivalent

Note: Summer reading is required.

This is a course designed for the college bound 12th grade student. Students will focus on the study of literature through the study of diverse psychological concepts, literary theories, and philosophies. Students will read major works drawn from World Literature. A variety of academic writing assignments, including literary analysis and argumentative, is the core of composition requirements. This course is taught utilizing an interdisciplinary, multi-media approach.

11001G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course can meet Applied Arts requirement

This course introduces the basic principles of print and broadcast journalism. Students choose to emphasize written or visual storytelling while gaining experience in multiple aspects of journalism, including interviewing, camera work, scripting, video editing, appearing on camera, magazine layout, and developing ideas into quality news stories. Students also work behind the scenes and on camera to create the daily bulletin announcement, Eagle Update. Students enrolled in this course have access to Adobe Creative Cloud editing software.

NEW

01059G12 / 01059G22

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: English 9 and 10 or equivalent

In this course, you can earn your junior or senior English credit by studying the literature of theatre. This is a great opportunity for those interested in history,  literature, or theatre–or anyone who wants to try something new. This comprehensive survey course traces major movements, people, and plays in world theatre history, from ancient to contemporary works. During the second term of the course, you will select one play for in-depth study. After researching the play’s historical context, dramatic structure, and themes, you will imagine a contemporary production and develop and present a design concept. The class will also be viewing and discussing theatre performances.

01064G12 

NEW

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

In this course, you can earn your junior or senior English credit by studying literature - songs, poetry, short stories, books - written by people of color in the United States. This discussion-based class will offer opportunities to meet with peers to explore literature as a form of resistance and social justice as well as an expression of joy. Students will gain a broader understanding of the role of literature in communities of color. Expect both shared reading experiences and readings based on individual interests. Students will analyze authors’ writing style, purpose, and voice in various academic writing assignments.

01151G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Even in today's digital world, the human voice has power. In this active, project- based class, you will learn to use your voice and your creativity to promote ideas, whether that means persuading others on social or political issues, promoting your own entrepreneurship, or informing and entertaining an audience. We'll start with a foundation of basic rhetoric and learn effective techniques for voice, diction, and posture. With those skills, we'll explore 21st century communication. We'll practice traditional speeches for an audience, and we'll work in newer mediums like giving a TED-Talk style presentation, doing character voices for digital media, or developing a podcast. This class will give you new skills and confidence - for any situation you'll have the advantage of knowing what to say and how to most effectively say it.

01203G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed for students in grades 10-12 who are motivated to improve their reading and language skills to a level expected by colleges. Critical reading, vocabulary development, and in depth study of English grammar and punctuation will be stressed in this course. It might serve as a review for the language and usage sections of the SAT and ACT tests and as a supplement to foreign language study. Because of the fast-paced, work-intensive environment, students should complete most of their work in class.

05064G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course meets a Fine Arts requirement

This hands-on class will provide authentic experience in multiple aspects of theatre production. Learn relevant research, design, communication, organization, and leadership skills while collaborating on projects ranging from publicity to design of sets, lighting, props, etc. Our projects will support the fall musical and winter shows (depending on the term).  No prior experience needed. You do not have to be involved in the cast or crew for the shows to participate in the class.

1 credit/term | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation

Note: This course earns students elective credits toward graduation

Using the ELD Standards from WIDA as a foundation, ELD I is designed for students at the Entering level of English proficiency.  This course focuses on building students' interpretive and expressive modes of communication in Social and Academic English through the content areas of Social Studies, Science, Language Arts and Math in order to prepare students for academic settings where English is the primary language used.

1 credit/term | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation

Note: This course earns students elective credits toward graduation

Using the ELD Standards from WIDA as a foundation, ELD 2 is designed for students at the Emerging level of English proficiency.  This course focuses on building students' interpretive and expressive modes of communication in Social and Academic English through the content areas of Social Studies, Science, Language Arts and Math in order to prepare students for academic settings where English is the primary language used.

1 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation

Note: This course earns students elective credits toward graduation

Using the ELD Standards from WIDA as a foundation, ELD 3 is designed for students at the Developing level of English proficiency.  This course focuses on building students' interpretive and expressive modes of communication in Social and Academic English through the content areas of Social Studies, Science, Language Arts and Math in order to prepare students for academic settings where English is the primary language used.

1 credit | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: EL Teacher recommendation

Note: This is a sheltered EL course and in addition to Human Geography 9, fulfills the 9th grade graduation requirement for Social Studies

Students will demonstrate critical thinking skills with a focus on the development, establishment and continuation of the American political system. Students learn about the rights and obligations of citizenship at the local, state, and national levels. Topics include: the three branches of government, relationships in government, amending the Constitution, and current issues in American democracy, as well as around the world. All students will access rigorous course content by engaging in simulations, debates, small & large group discussions, online learning, and analysis of current issues. Students will read material that is often above grade level.

1 credit | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: EL teacher recommendation

Note: This is a sheltered EL course and in addition to Democratic Foundations, fulfills the 9th grade graduation requirement for Social Studies.

This course focuses on human geography, examining the themes of culture, population, politics, urbanization, and agriculture. Students will read materials for main ideas, analyze, synthesize, identify bias, determine cause and effect, interpret graphs, charts, tables and maps. In addition, students will use geo-technologies, such as ArcGIS (Geographic Information Systems) to analyze current topics within the stated themes. Ultimately, students will apply their geographic skills to critically analyze and offer solutions to current world issues.

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: EL teacher recommendation

Note: Students must register for both terms. This is a sheltered EL course and fulfills the 10th grade graduation requirement for Social Studies.

This course is a thematic look at United States History from the early 1800’s through present day. Unit topics include: American identity, expansionism, Constitution in crisis, role of the federal government and United States and the world. This course fulfills the State of Minnesota high school American History requirements.

NEW

22152E11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Interior Design Studio

Note: Fulfills an Applied Arts requirement

Continue learning design and decorating skills and build upon what you learned in Interior Design. Students will learn current design styles as well as those of the past. Students will demonstrate learning by completing a variety of design projects both commercial and residential. They will design spaces based on a variety of clients’ needs and wants. Knowledge and skills gained could apply to a career in fields such as real estate, residential or commercial interior design, architecture, or home furnishings.

22101G11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Must have the willingness to interact and work with 3-5 year old children.

Note: This is a 2 term course.

This class is ideal for the student who is considering working with children and/or becoming a parent. Course content includes physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development of children, theories of child development, and various parenting skills. As part of this class, students will work with children in an actual preschool setting during the second term of the course. Term B is writing intensive. Students must successfully complete the Term A portion of the course. They must demonstrate the skills to work with pre-school children in order to continue on to Term B.

22102G22

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to provide insight into the dynamics of relationships by examining common stages: dating, marriage, cohabitation, childbearing, and loss. It is a great class for students interested in the social services field. Other learning areas include sexuality-related topics, prenatal development, and birth.  Part of the course includes either a computerized infant/parenting simulator project or a new parent research project. This is a discussion-based course.

19153G11

1 credit |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Strong reading/math skills are required to tutor elementary students at the 5th grade level. Minimum of 2.5 GPA required.

Students in this class will be offering academic reinforcement to elementary school age children. This class is for 11th and 12th graders who are considering a career working with school-age children.  Students will tutor four days each week at an elementary school. Students must provide their own transportation to the mentor site, and be academically successful in math and reading.

19208G11

1 credit | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: None

If the world of fashion interests you, then this is the class to take. With a focus on both creativity and merchandising, this course will allow you to explore interests and possible career paths related to the fashion industry. Through various projects students will look back at the history of fashion, study current designers, learn about the principles & elements of design, body types & fashion solutions, fabrics & fibers, apparel production, and merchandising. You will learn how to draw fashion designs and create a portfolio of your work.

22051G12

1 credit | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: None

Students in this introductory foods course will practice basic cooking skills related to measuring, food terminology, tools and equipment, kitchen and food safety, nutrition, special diets and meal preparation. Students will prepare and eat foods during labs that may include quick breads, omelets, pasta, fruits, vegetables, and meat cookery.

22051G22

1 credit | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: Food Fundamentals

Note: Fulfills an Applied Arts graduation requirement.

Articulated College Credit Available

This class is open to 9-12th graders and is an excellent choice for students interested in the culinary field. While students are cooking and eating in lab, they will focus on food presentation and buffet design and applying information such as garnishes, herbs and spices, appetizers, cheeses, soups, and pastries. Students will also tour through regional foods of the United States and explore cultural foods of the world. Speakers and research will offer students new insights into gourmet and ethnic foods.

22103G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Are you ready to live on your own? This course helps prepare you to live independently by learning about decision- making, getting a job, money management, budgeting, apartment hunting, credit, banking, insurance, and investment options. Great class for all students!

22152G11

1 credit | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Fulfills an Applied Arts Requirement

Explore the world of homes and interiors as you gain skills in decorating and design. Students will study decorating styles, furniture arrangements, elements/principles of design, and floor plan layout. Learning will be demonstrated through completion of a variety of projects using traditional design and computer aided design. Knowledge and skills gained could apply to a career in fields such as real estate, residential or commercial interior design, architecture, or home furnishings.

22105G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This is designed to examine and understand the cause, effects and the complexities that certain life issues may have on the individual and their relationships. Some of the topics studied throughout the course include: the personality, eating disorders, self-injury, anxiety, depression, suicide, addiction, and child abuse. This is an excellent choice for students interested in the social sciences.

22999G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This 11-12th grade class meets ½ of the period for two quarters. You will earn a total of one credit. Students with and without disabilities work together to learn about the challenges and realities of living with a disability. The students plan and participate in class activities to promote social interaction. Each class completes a community service project, research project, and hosts a homecoming celebration as a social event. Students who are interested in teaching, medicine, or careers working with persons who have disabilities should take this class. A class goal is increasing peer interaction for students who live with disabilities.

22151G13

1 credit | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: None

Fulfills an Applied Arts Requirement

Students will have fun learning to use a sewing machine. They will sew a pillowcase, mittens, pajama pants, and a bag. Fashion concepts of color, line, and design will be covered. Reading and comprehension of pattern directions, measuring, and analyzing patterns for simple size alterations are part of the curriculum.

22151G23

1 credit | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: Sewing I

This course is open to 9-12th grade students who have passed Sewing I. Students will develop advanced sewing skills in this class and will have the opportunity to construct a zippered decorator pillow, zippered skirt, and a collared shirt. Students will investigate pattern design and alterations and will also further develop sewing skills such as pattern reading, making buttonholes, putting a collar and sleeves on a garment, and using interfacing.

08055E11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Health Education

Note: This course is for elective credit only.

First Aid and CPR/AED Certification is an elective Health Class. This is an active, participatory class which includes hands on activities, speakers, and field trips. Students are trained in American Heart Association First Aid and CPR for Adult, Child and Infant and AED training. Upon completion of this class, students will earn an official Certification for First Aid and CPR/AED Certification. In addition to these life saving skills the students will learn how to live a healthy lifestyle through a unit on nutrition and physical activity. Students must have completed the health education graduation requirement before taking this course.

08051G11

Prerequisite: None
Grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
Credits: 1

Recommendation: The health education department recommends this course be taken sophomore year, but it can be taken any time.

This course is designed for students to gain knowledge and develop healthy attitudes to make responsible decisions that enhance individual, family, and community health. Students will evaluate their own wellness and focus on selected areas of contemporary health issues. Units include Mental Health and Wellness, Drug and Addiction Education, Relationships and Reproductive Health and Wellness. Community speakers and resources, class projects, and interpersonal communication skills are part of the essential learning targets for this course.

08051G11BL

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Recommendation: The health education department recommends this course be taken sophomore year, but it can be taken any time.

This is the same course as Health Education but delivered in a Blended / Hybrid format. Blended / Hybrid courses are designed and delivered by EPHS staff. They offer a mix of face to face and online instruction. Course content has elements of student control over time, place, path and/or pace with the goal of affording each student a more personalized learning experience.

Students will be required to attend class in the classroom setting on specific days communicated by the teacher (including all guest speaker presentations).

08057G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Health Education

Note: This course is for elective credit only.

This course will focus on making behavioral changes that directly impact students' lives. Stress management, happiness, self-esteem, empathy, friendship, love, showing gratitude, acts of kindness, connecting with others personally are all behaviors rich in research that have great impacts in our overall happiness. The Science of Happiness would be organized around a series of themes presented weekly. Each theme is presented over the course of a week, where students will hone in on a specific topic or skill that's important to a happy life, each theme being backed by research. Students will perform a "lifestyle change project" as the summative assessment for this course.

10207E34 / 10207E44

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: iOS Mobile App Development AND both AP Computer Science A: Java AND AP Computer Sci Principles

Extend your learning from iOS, develop new apps, go further with your first project - learn a new section of swift.  Successful completion of BOTH AP CSP and AP CS A (Java) are required for a second year of iOS.

02006G14 / 02006G24

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None 

Note: This course is offered for elective credit only.

All students who have not successfully completed Algebra I (linear algebra) in middle school or another school district must complete this course. This course will use a variety of instructional methods to engage students in the study of algebra. After successful completion of Algebra I, students should enroll in Geometry.

02142G12 / 02142G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry

Note: Students must register for both terms A & B of this course. Successful completion of the Algebra II course is a graduation requirement.

This course provides the foundation for the study of advanced mathematics. Topics include:  linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions. Students will simplify complex expressions, powers, and roots, and solve equations, inequalities, and systems of equations through graphing and algebraic reasoning. The topics of sequences and series and an introduction to complex numbers are also explored in Algebra II. After successful completion of Algebra II, students should enroll in FST.

******* / *******

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Only
Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
Credits: 2

The Algebra II Standards Based course provides the foundation for the study of advanced mathematics. Topics include: linear, quadratic, polynomial, radical, and exponential functions. There is extensive work on simplification of expressions, powers, and roots, solving equations and inequalities, and solving systems of equations. This course is specifically designed for students who have been identified by their counselor or previous mathematics teacher as needing a more individualized, standards-based curriculum as opposed to the traditional or accelerated Algebra II curriculum.

02106G12 / 02106G22

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: FST

Note: A grade average of “C” or higher in  FST

College Credit Available

This course is a great start to a student’s college transcript!  It is recommended for students who are college bound, but do not necessarily desire to be math majors. Algebra & Trigonometry emphasizes the properties of functions and their graphs. Concepts covered throughout the two terms of the course are: linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions as well as matrices, determinants, conic functions and trigonometry. Other topics include solving equations, inequalities, and systems of equations. This course is not open to students who have successfully completed Pre-calculus with a “B” or better.

02121G12 / 02121G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or Honors Pre-Calculus

Note: A grade average of “B” or higher in Pre-Calculus or Honors Pre-Calculus.

An introduction to calculus that does not count for college credit. This course is for students planning to take calculus in college. - OR - For regular Precalculus students (grade B or higher recommended) and Honors Precalculus students who want to solidify their computational calculus skills, this course provides a bridge to take the more application-based AP Calculus the following year.  Topics include limits, derivatives, integrals, and their applications.

02122E12 / 02122E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: AP BC Calculus

Note: A grade average of “B” or higher in AP Calculus AB and BC

College Credit Available

This course offers the opportunity to those students who have completed the AP Calculus curriculum as underclassmen to continue in a college level math course. The students can expect the same rigor as in the AP classes as they explore rectangular, parametric and polar functions, vectors and graphs in more than two dimensions.

10157G12 / 10157G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Read & write at grade level

Note: Fulfills the EPHS Technology Graduation Requirement

You will learn how to design and build mobile apps - apps that are aware of their location, drawing apps that integrate with your camera, and completely original apps that you plan, design, code and test. The only limit is your own imagination. But computer science is not just about coding. So, we will also learn broadly about the fundamental principles of computer science. We’ll learn about the potential and the limitations of computing and coding. We'll learn how the Internet works and how encryption is used to protect our Internet transactions. We’ll learn about the positive and negative aspects of computing in today's society. We’ll learn about the growing career opportunities in the wide field of computer science.

10258G11

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course covers the basic ways that criminals and security experts break—and break into— computer systems. The topics included in this course will change as “black hats” find new ways to infiltrate networks, stand-alone machines, smartphones, and, of course, personal computers. 

Several possible topics could be Denial of Service attacks, phishing scams, the Internet of Things, Trojan horses, and ransomware. Students will learn about these topics by hacking into password-protected machines; reading scientific publications and security reports; analyzing, and then writing, malicious software; and researching operating system exploits, including those in iOS, Android, and Windows.

02103G12 / 02103G22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II

Note: If you have completed any math classes beyond Honors Algebra 2 or PreCalculus, you are unable to take FST to meet your statistics graduation requirement as there is algebraic content overlap. Students who took Honors Algebra II have two options to meet their statistics graduation requirement: 

  • option 1: Statistics and Data Science
  • option 2:  AP Statistics

Students must register for both terms A & B of this course.

This course provides the foundation for the study of advanced mathematics and continues the topics presented in Algebra II. Topics include: linear, quadratic, radical, rational, and trigonometric functions. Statistics is a strong component of this course. Many applications are studied with the assistance of a graphing calculator. This course has been designed for those who have completed Algebra II and completes the courses required for graduation.  Students who are successful in FST often go on to take Statistics and Data Science, Algebra & Trigonometry, or Pre-Calculus.

02103G12BL / 02103G22BL

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry

Blended FST is a self-paced mastery method designed course with three levels of content completion: FST Standards, FST, and Honors FST. Students will move at a personalized pace to master each concept of the course. Instruction in this course is through video lessons, peer collaboration, and small group instruction.

This course provides the foundation for the study of advanced mathematics and continues the topics presented in Algebra II. FST topics include: linear, quadratic, polynomial, radical, rational, exponential, trigonometric functions, probability, and statistics.

Successful completion of the Standards FST course meets all graduation requirements, but does not meet the prerequisites for any other math course at EPHS. Students who complete FST will be equipped to take College Algebra, Pre-Calculus, Statistics and Data Science, or AP Statistics. Students completing Honors FST are also eligible for Honors Pre-Calculus in addition to those aforementioned courses.

******* / *******

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Algebra II or Algebra II Standards (Teacher Recommendation Only)

Note: This class is not for students who have completed Honors Algebra II or Pre-Calculus and beyond. Successful completion of FST Standards, FST, Statistics and Analytics, or AP Statistics is a graduation requirement.

Students must register for both terms A & B of this course.

This course provides students an opportunity to learn and demonstrate mastery of the remaining math standards required for graduation and continues the topics presented in Algebra 2. Topics include: linear, quadratic, polynomial, radical, rational, exponential, and trigonometric (right triangle) functions. Statistics is a strong component of this course. This course has been designed for those who have completed Algebra II or Algebra II Standards.

02072G12 / 02072G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Algebra 8 or Honors Algebra 8 (at CMS) or Algebra I (at EPHS)

Note: The successful completion of Geometry A & B is a graduation requirement.

Students will study the language, logic, and applications of geometry.  Students will communicate their problem solving skills, construct logical arguments, and analyze patterns to measure the world around them in terms of space, shape and size. After successful completion of Geometry, students should enroll in Algebra II. Students who are successful in Geometry often go on to take AP Computer Science Principles.

10207E14 / 10207E24

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: AP Computer Sci Principles or AP Computer Science A: Java

Learn the basics of mobile app development for the iOS platform, including iPhone, iPad, Watch and Apple TV.  Successful completion of either AP Computer Science A: Java or AP Computer Sci Principles and passing (3 or greater) of either AP exam is required.

02110G12 / 02110G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Honors Algebra II or FST

Note: Grade average of “B” or higher in Honors Algebra II or FST (Term A). If earned average of “C” in FST (Term A), it is recommended to complete Algebra-Trigonometry prior to taking Pre-Calculus A&B to strengthen their algebraic skills.

This course should be taken by students who want to be challenged by higher level thinking and analysis in the world of mathematics. The main emphasis of the course is to expand on Algebra II, FST, and Geometry by a more in depth study of functions, graphing (graphical analysis), and trigonometry as well as other advanced topics beyond the scope of previous courses.  Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course (recommended Texas Instruments TI-89 or TI-84 calculator). Students who are successful (B or higher) in Pre-Calculus often go on to take Calculus, AP Calculus, AP Computer Science A (Java), Statistics and Data Science, and/or AP Statistics.

02202G12 / 02202G22

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Honors Algebra II or FST

"The best thing about being a statistician is that you get to play in everyone's backyard."
John Tukey (1915-2000)

Statistics and Data Science provides a practical introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Students learn statistical reasoning: collecting data, analyzing data, and making reasonable conclusions. Use of technology will be prominent. Throughout the course, students complete investigations on topics of their choice that require statistical reasoning and focus on clear, concise communication of technical information. This course is an excellent preparation for college-level statistics and can be taken concurrently with other math courses.

02142E12 / 02142E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Honors Geometry or Geometry (per teacher recommendation only)

Note: Honors Geometry with a “B” or better grade average. Regular Geometry students with teacher recommendation.

Expectations include mastery of Algebra I concepts. Students should be able to work independently and in groups and be highly motivated and willing to accept a challenge. This is a fast paced and rigorous course. In addition to topics covered in Algebra II, enriched units may include advanced functions, complex numbers, solving polynomials, logarithms, and analytic trigonometry. Students who complete Honors Algebra II must also complete either AP Statistics or Statistics and Data Science in order to meet graduation requirements. In addition, students who are successful in Honors Algebra II often go on to take Pre-calculus or Honors Pre-calculus.

02072E12 / 02072E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Honors Algebra 8, or teacher recommendation

Note: Grade of A- or better in Algebra I, Honors Algebra 8 strongly recommended.

Honors Geometry students will study the language, logic and applications of geometry. Students will communicate their problem solving skills, construct logical arguments, and analyze patterns to measure the world around them in terms of space, shape and size. Enrichment comes in the form of more challenging projects, significant emphasis on written work associated with projects, challenge-of-the-mind exercises and more challenging daily work. After successful completion of Honors Geometry, students should enroll in either Algebra II or Honors Algebra II. Students who are successful in Honors Geometry often go on to take AP Computer Science Principles.

02110E12 / 02110E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Honors Algebra II or teacher recommendation

Note: A grade average of “B” or higher in Honors Algebra II

This course should be taken by students who want to be challenged by higher-level thinking and analysis in the world of mathematics. The core curriculum is the same as Pre-Calculus with the addition of honors level extensions and discussions of advanced topics. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course (recommended Texas Instruments TI-89 or TI-84 calculator).  Students who are successful (A- or higher) in Honors Pre-Calculus often go on to take Calculus, AP Calculus, AP Computer Science A (Java), Statistics and Data Science, and/or AP Statistics.

02124E12 / 02124E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or Honors Pre-Calculus

Note: A grade average of “A” or higher in Pre-Calculus or "B" or higher in Honors Pre-Calculus.

College Credit Available

This course offers an environment where students can study, learn, and make discoveries in the different areas of calculus. A graphing calculator is required for the course (TI-84, TI-89 or TI-Nspire are recommended). Although students can take this course alone and take the AP AB Calculus exam in May, it is highly recommended that students continue on to AP BC Calculus in the same year.  We have found that by doing this, students tend to score better on the AP exams, and are also in a position to take Calculus 3 (Multivariable Calculus) the following year.

02125E12 / 02125E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: AP AB Calculus or, in some cases, regular Calculus with instructor approval.

Note: A grade average of “C” or higher in AP Calculus AB.

College Credit Available

This course is a continuation of the AP AB Calculus curriculum and it prepares students for the AP BC Calculus exam in May.  Those who complete the AP AB Calculus course should expect the same rigor.  While it is possible to take AP AB Calculus and AP BC Calculus in separate years, it is highly recommended that all four terms be completed in the same year.  We have found that by doing this, students tend to score better on the AP exam and are also in a position to take Calculus 3 (Multivariable Calculus) the following year.

10157E12 / 10157E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Read & write at grade level

Note: Fulfills the EPHS Technology Graduation Requirement

College Credit Available

A rigorous, fast-paced course that gets you ready for the AP CSP exam (given nationally in May). We practice computational thinking and learn about the wide field of computer science. Some days we are writing code in MIT App Inventor, reading about DDoS attacks, arguing about whose job it is to provide internet access to all (or some), or working in teams to solve puzzles, practice sorting algorithms or create post-it art. We discuss the impact that Big Data has on our world, what happened to our privacy and what is double factor authentication among other topics. As an AP level class, we will build a digital portfolio to send to the College Board; read and write critically about data and algorithms; and prepare for the rigorous AP multiple choice test in the spring.

10158E12 / 10158E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: AP CSP or Honors Algebra II or FST

College Credit Available

AP CS A: Java is a challenging course that prepares you for the AP CS A: Java exam offered in May. Most students who take Java intend to take (or have taken) Precalculus. This course requires deep thinkers who love to problem solve. Figuring out why algorithms work (or don't), anticipating challenges and celebrating when everything is successful make this a rewarding adventure in computing. AP CS A: Java is an ideal course before starting the calculus sequence. Increasing your logical thinking skills, revealing how algorithms function and making your thinking transparent will help you in future mathematics, science, and engineering courses. We work hard, tackle complex problems, and create inventive solutions.

02203E11

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Honors Algebra II OR FST

Note: A grade average of “B” or higher in FST or Honors Algebra II is recommended.

College Credit Available

Preparation for the AP exam will be provided in class and students are strongly encouraged to take the examination. Advanced Placement Statistics will introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting data, analyzing data, and drawing conclusions from data. The course follows four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns; Planning a Study: Deciding what and how to measure; Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability and simulation; and Statistical Inference: Estimating parameters and testing hypotheses. Students are required to have a graphing calculator for this course (recommended Texas Instruments TI-89 or TI-84).

05101G14 / 05101G24 / 05101G34 / 05101G44

1 or 2 credits  |  9  |

Prerequisite: Previous playing experience required

Note: Auditions may be held at the end of the first semester to help determine 2nd semester band placement.

A wide variety of music literature will be studied and performed in a major concert each term. The fundamentals of basic musicianship will be emphasized in each class. Playoff pep band performances will occur during terms 1, 2, and 3 for all football, soccer, basketball, and hockey teams that reach Region finals and beyond. All band members are encouraged to take lessons to develop personal music understanding, appreciation, playing techniques, and musicianship; however, lessons may also be provided by the school instructor. This class will meet daily for 45 minutes. Students must enroll for a minimum of one semester (two consecutive terms); although a one-year commitment is recommended.

05105G116 / 05105G316 / 05105G416 / 05105G216

1 credit/semester  |  9  |

Prerequisite: Previous string playing experience required

9th Grade Orchestra is open to all 9th grade string players who are interested in continuing their musical studies playing 4-5 performances a year. The primary focus of this class is the sequential development of technical and musical skills necessary for independent and group performances. 9th Grade Orchestra represents EPHS on national/state tours, contests/festivals, and community/school events. All students are encouraged to take lessons to develop personal musical understanding, appreciation, playing technique and musicianship. The ensemble meets daily for half of a block period. Incoming 9th grade students are highly encouraged to register for all 4 terms, but are required to register for 2 terms. Students will earn 1 credit per semester. Students are also encouraged to sign-up for the computer technology classes that meet opposite class.

05110G58 / 05110G68 / 05110G78 / 05110G88

1 credit/semester  |  9  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Students must register for a minimum of one semester (two consecutive terms); although a one-year commitment is recommended.

This is EPHS’s entry level all low voice ensemble for males, or low singers, who seek a beginning to intermediate choral experience in a 9th grade Tenor, Baritone, and Bass vocal ensemble. This ensemble will sing a wide variety of two and three-part literature in a wide variety of languages and styles. Students focus on music reading, vocal production, music history and musical expression. Bass Clef Choir meets for half of a block period daily and performs in four concerts throughout the year.

05102G211 / 05102G311 / 05102G411

0.5 credit/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Previous playing experience required

Note:  Students must enroll for a minimum of one semester (two consecutive terms); although a three-term commitment is recommended.

A wide variety of music literature will be studied and performed in a major concert each term. The fundamentals of basic musicianship will be emphasized in each class. Playoff pep band performances will occur during terms 1, 2 and 3 for all football, soccer, basketball, volleyball, and hockey teams that reach Region finals and beyond. The 10th Grade Band may represent EPHS at the Region 6AA large group contest held each spring. All band members are encouraged to take lessons to develop personal music understanding, appreciation, playing techniques, and musicianship; however lessons may provided by the school instructor. This class will meet daily for 45 minutes.

05111E1316 / 05111E1416 / 05111E1516 / 05111E1616

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Audition in spring prior (current Concert Choir Members do not need to re-audition)

Note: Students must register for 4 terms and will earn one credit per semester.

This is EPHS’s top performing choral group selected through a non-threatening audition process. This ensemble is a mixed vocal group designed for the more experienced singer who wishes to sing a broad variety of quality literature while expanding his/her understanding of music and developing his/her own voice. Concert Choir represents the school on national/state tours, contests and festivals, community and school events, and concerts. This ensemble meets daily for half of a block period.

05105E1316 / 05105E1416 / 05105E1516 / 05105E1616

1 credit/semester  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Audition in Spring; initial registration is open to previous Concert Orchestra members only.

Concert Orchestra is the most advanced orchestral performing group at EPHS playing 7-8 concerts per year. Students will continue to develop musical and technical skills necessary for insightful interpretation and performance of advanced orchestral literature. Members of the Concert Orchestra are eligible to audition for the Chamber Orchestra (a select co-curricular ensemble). Concert Orchestra represents EPHS on national/state tours, contests/festivals, and community/school events. All students are encouraged to take lessons to develop personal musical understanding, appreciation, playing technique and musicianship. This ensemble meets daily for half of a block period and the remainder of the block will occasionally be used for sectionals, small ensemble rehearsal and/or lessons. Students must register for all 4 terms and will earn 1 credit per semester. Students must sign up for an audition in the spring to be eligible for placement in Concert Orchestra. The orchestra often meets with Wind Ensemble members to perform full orchestra pieces including winds, brass, and percussion.

05102G111

0.5 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Previous playing experience required

A wide variety of music literature will be studied and performed in a major concert first term. The fundamentals of basic musicianship will be emphasized in each class. Depending on class size, the ensemble may be divided into smaller like-instrument chamber ensembles to develop confidence and independence. All band members are encouraged to take lessons to develop personal music understanding, appreciation, playing techniques, and musicianship; however lessons may be provided by the school instructor. This class will be daily for 45 minutes.

05105G916 / 05105G1016 / 05105G1116 / 05105G1216

1 credit/semester  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Audition in Spring; initial registration is open to students who are auditioning.

Concertino Orchestra is the second most advanced orchestral performing group at EPHS playing 6-7 concerts per year. Concertino will work on technical skills to help advance them to the concert level. Students will continue to develop musical and technical skills necessary for insightful interpretation and performance of medium to advanced orchestral literature.

Concertino Orchestra represents EPHS on national/state tours, contests/festivals, and community/school events. All students are encouraged to take lessons to develop personal musical understanding, appreciation, playing technique and musicianship. This ensemble meets daily for half of a block period and the remainder of the block will occasionally be used for sectionals, small ensemble rehearsal and/or lessons. Students must register for all 4 terms and will earn 1 credit per semester. Students must sign up for an audition in the spring to be eligible for placement in Concertino Orchestra.

5111G116 / 05111G216 / 05111G316 / 05111G416

1 credit/semester  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Students must register for a minimum of one semester (two consecutive terms)

Eagle Choir is a mixed vocal ensemble available to students in grades 10-12. This ensemble will sing a wide variety of literature in a wide variety of languages and styles. Students continue to focus on music reading, vocal production, music history and musical expression. Eagle Choir meets for half of a block period daily. Eagle Choir may combine with Justice Singers for various performance opportunities.

05103G11

1 credit  | 9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Musical/visual audition in May

Co-requisite: Students must also enroll in a concert band (9th Grade Band, 10th Grade Concert Band, Symphonic Band, or Wind Ensemble) for at least one additional term (2, 3, or 4) to be eligible for participation in Eagle Band.  We strongly encourage students to remain in band throughout the entire year!

Note: 9th grade students may be admitted in to the colorguard portion of Eagle Marching Band based on teacher recommendation and audition.

Eagle Marching Band is a performance-based band that involves several performances during 1st term. This band is committed to excellence in music education, personal development, and musical and visual performance.  As a member of the Eagle Marching Band, you are expected to: 1) Attend and participate in all weekly July/August practices and Band Camp in August; 2) Attend and participate in all performances in August, September, and October; 3) Memorize at least 10 minutes of music, equipment work, and marching drill; 4) Successfully pass a memorization test; 5) Register with the MN State High School League and abide by its regulations for participation in co-curricular activities (Eagle Band is BOTH curricular and co-curricular); and 6) Pay the requisite fees.

05126G11

1 credit/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Justice Singers is comprised of kids interested in making music and singing in a nontraditional and interactive choral setting. This group will sing and participate in music from different genres with text that deals with struggle, solidarity, justice, equality, protest, understanding, peace and hope. In addition to singing, students will have the opportunity to engage in conversation with one another, dialogue with and learn from guest speakers and musicians, create media, art and movement to enhance songs as well as explore and play musical instruments. Students will also have the opportunity to share their music in the community. 

Justice Singers is a mixed vocal ensemble available to students in grades 10-12. Students will also focus on vocal production, music reading, and musical expression. Unlike the other choral ensembles, Justice Singers will be offered for a full block for one term.

23251G12

1 credit/semester  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Music Insights is a course designed for the inclusion of students in general education and students in special education to work together in a tactile music setting. While integrating the Arts in the education of both students with and without special needs, students engage in social interaction and develop relationships and musical skills together. Students will learn and perform basic music concepts. Students will be exposed to and included in many forms of music learning and creation through individual and group exploration. Music instruction will be modified and adapted to meet the needs of each individual student. This course will meet for half of a block period for an entire semester, and the course will include a public performance by the students.

05117G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course does not fulfill the Fine Arts graduation requirement

This course is open to any student who would like to learn about music styles from traditional to rock and hip hop. Students will learn to use descriptive musical vocabulary and to identify musical form; analyze and describe music through listening, writing, and discussion; study music of historical significance and relate it to music today; examine musical design and form; and identify and interpret cultural and ideological information embedded in music.

NEW

05116G11 

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course does not fulfill the Fine Arts graduation requirement

This is a brand-new music class that is offered to students who are curious about trying new instruments, want to play modern music, learn music skills, and "jam out" in a fun and flexible environment. Students don't need to have any prior music or instrumental experience in order to take this course. Students who DO have experience are also welcome to be a part of this course to share and fine-tune their skills. Throughout the course, students will have access to drum sets, acoustic guitars, electric guitars, electric bass guitars, percussion instruments, and keyboards to learn the fundamentals of basic rock band instruments.

NEW

05116G11S 

1 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course does not fulfill the Fine Arts graduation requirement.

This is a brand-new music class that is offered to students who are curious about trying new instruments, want to play modern music, learn music skills, and "jam out" in a fun and flexible environment. Students don't need to have any prior music or instrumental experience in order to take this course. Students who DO have experience are also welcome to be a part of this course to share and fine-tune their skills. Throughout the course, students will have access to drum sets, acoustic guitars, electric guitars, electric bass guitars, percussion instruments, and keyboards to learn the fundamentals of basic rock band instruments. This course will meet for half of a block period for an entire semester and may be taken opposite an additional music ensemble in the same period, if scheduling allows. Please also register for your music ensemble if this option is of interest to you. If you aren’t concurrently registered for a music ensemble opposite of this course, you would have an “open half” or study hall.

05102G511 / 05102G611 / 05102G711

0.5 credit/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Previous playing experience required

Note: Students must enroll for a minimum of one semester (two consecutive terms); although a three-term commitment is recommended.

A wide variety of music literature will be studied and performed in a major concert each term. The fundamentals of basic musicianship will be emphasized in each class. Playoff pep band performances will occur during terms 1, 2 and 3 for all football, soccer, basketball, volleyball, and hockey teams that reach Region finals and beyond. The Symphonic Band may represent EPHS at the Region 6AA large group contest held each spring. Students enrolled for the entire year in this class will be eligible to participate in possible performance tours. All band members are encouraged to take lessons to develop personal music understanding, appreciation, playing techniques, and musicianship; however, lessons may also be provided by the instructor. This class will meet daily for 45 minutes.

05105G516 / 05105G616 / 05105G716 / 05105G816

1 credit/semester  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Previous string playing experience required

Note: Students are highly encouraged to register for all 4 terms but are required to register for 2 terms. Students will earn 1 credit per semester. If only registering for 1 semester, you must register for 1st semester only. Half year students are unable to register for 2nd semester.

The primary focus of this class is the sequential development of technical and musical skills necessary for independent and group performances. Symphonic Orchestra represents EPHS on national/state tours, contests/festivals, and community/school events. All students are encouraged to take lessons to develop personal musical understanding, appreciation, playing technique and musicianship. The ensemble meets daily for half of a block period.

05110G18 / 05110G28 / 05110G38 / 05110G48

1 credit/semester  |  9  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Students must register for a minimum of one semester (two consecutive terms); although a one-year commitment is recommended.

This is EPHS’s entry level all high voice ensemble for females, or high singers, who seek a beginning to intermediate choral experience in a 9th grade Soprano I, Soprano II, and Alto vocal ensemble. This ensemble will sing a wide variety of two and three-part literature in a wide variety of languages and styles. Students focus on music reading, vocal production, music history and musical expression. Treble Choir meets for half of a block period daily and performs in four concerts throughout the year.

05108G11

1 credit/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course does not fulfill the Fine Arts graduation requirement

Ukulele is open to all students 10-12, ranging in degrees of experience on the instrument. Beginners as well as students who have started learning are welcome. The primary focus of this class is to introduce students to the ukulele, teach them playing skills, and encourage community based ukulele "jams". Each student moves at an individual pace, but group work is encouraged as students advance in their skill. Chord chart reading, singing, and composition are fundamental in the curriculum.

05111G916 / 05111G1016 / 05111G1116 / 05111G1216

1 credit/semester  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Audition or Teacher Recommendation in spring prior

Note: Students must register for a minimum of one semester (two consecutive terms); although a one-year commitment is recommended.

This is EPHS’s “next level” all high voice ensemble after Treble Choir for females, or high singers, who seek a continuing choral experience in a Soprano I, Soprano II, and Alto vocal ensemble. This ensemble is selected through a non-threatening audition process or by teacher recommendation. A wide variety of music with emphasis on three and four-part harmony will be sung. This class will meet daily for half of a block period and performs in four concerts throughout the year, in addition to possible choir tour, field trips, contests, or festival opportunities.

05111G516 / 05111G616 / 05111G716 / 05111G816

1 credit/semester  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Audition or Teacher Recommendation in spring prior

Note: Students must register for a minimum of one semester (two consecutive terms); although a one-year commitment is recommended.

This is EPHS’s “next level” all low voice ensemble after Bass Clef Choir for males, or low singers, who seek a continuing choral experience in a Tenor, Baritone, and Bass vocal ensemble. This ensemble is selected through a non-threatening audition process or by teacher recommendation. A wide variety of music with emphasis on two and three-part harmony will be sung. This class will meet daily for half of a block period and performs in four concerts throughout the year, in addition to possible choir tour, field trips, contests, or festival opportunities.

05102E911 / 05102E1011 / 05102E1111

0.5 credit/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Audition in spring; initial registration is open to previous Wind Ensemble members only.

A wide variety of music literature will be studied and performed in a major concert each term.  The fundamentals of advanced musicianship and ensemble skills will be emphasized in each class. Playoff pep band performances will occur during terms 1, 2 and 3 for all football, soccer, basketball, volleyball, and hockey teams that reach Region finals and beyond. The Wind Ensemble will represent EPHS at the Region 6AA large group contest, at the Lake Conference Band Festival, and on regularly scheduled national/international tours.  All band members are encouraged to take lessons to develop personal music understanding, appreciation, playing techniques, and musicianship; however, lessons may also be provided by the instructor.  This class will meet daily for 45 minutes.  Students must register for all four terms.  Students enrolled in Eagle Band (0701) are exempt from the first term Wind Ensemble requirement.

Academic Seminar is a Tier II daily intervention. The curriculum includes teaching, practicing and reinforcing organizational, study and self- advocacy skills; providing assistance for homework completion; supporting an increase in positive adult interactions and increasing progress monitoring of academic and social success. For additional information, please contact your counselor.

AVID, which stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination, is a college readiness program designed to help students develop the skills they need to be successful in college. At EPHS, AVID scholars are expected to take one honors/AP or stretch course each year that they are part of the AVID program. The AVID Elective class not only offers support to students in these AP and Honors courses but also engages them in AVID-designed curriculum grounded in WICOR (Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration, Organization, and Reading) strategies.

AVID scholars must commit to passing their classes with C’s or higher, maintaining a 2.5 GPA, maintaining an organization/ “to-do list” system, engaging in the tutorial process with AVID tutors, and focus heavily on career exploration and college/scholarship/financial literacy curriculum. AVID is designed to increase overall academic performance, success in rigorous coursework, and participation in activities at school. Students must apply to be enrolled in the AVID Elective course. Students who have applied and are accepted to the AVID program should leave two blocks open when registering for courses. If you are interested in applying to be a student in the AVID elective, please contact your high school counselor.

19151G11

1 credit (4 NCC)  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

College Credit Available

Introduction to Education provides an overview of the education profession and the U.S. educational system, including historical development, social foundations and educational institutions. Other topics include current theories, trends and issues in education and the community, certification standards, roles and responsibilities of teachers, learners, and other school personnel. Every student must complete a 25-hour field experience in an area school.

This course will be offered at EPHS in conjunction with Normandale Community College and students will receive concurrent enrollment credits upon successful completion of each course. Course will be taught be EPHS staff and is intended for students who may be considering a career in Education or a related field after high school.

19154G11

1 credit (3 NCC)  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: EDUC 1101

College Credit Available

Introduces pre-service teachers to core concepts and approaches to multicultural education including issues related to student, family, and community diversity based on culture, language, race, class, gender, sexual identity, and disability. Issues discourses, hierarchy of education with regards to privilege, equity and access to high quality education are topics that will be addressed. as sStudents will use knowledge of their life experiences and those of diverse students in urban and rural public schools and learn culturally and linguistically responsive classroom strategies. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating the multicultural competence required of all successful teachers working with today's diverse youth. Field experience hours are part of the course requirements.

04260G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

In this course students will be encouraged to think critically about American society through the exploration of identity, systemic inequities, and social justice in the United States. Students will begin the course discussing what identity is and then exploring their own identity. We will discuss inequities in society, entertainment, politics, the judicial system, economics, and education. The course will culminate with the Impact Project: an opportunity for students to identify a systemic inequity in their community and then create and implement an action plan to address it. Student learning in the course will be facilitated through readings, presentations, and discussion. Major assessments for the course will include the Impact Project, a detailed racial autobiography, and an analysis of systemic inequities.

08009G24

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Total Body Conditioning or Group Fitness

Students will participate in advanced cardio, core, upper and lower body strength activities throughout the term. The emphasis is on improving each student’s overall fitness and strength level. Each student will know how to develop a personal fitness plan and will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength. This class may be repeated.

08010G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Must be at least 15 yrs. old by the end of the class; swim 300 yards continuously; swim 20 yards and retrieve a 10 lb. object from a depth of 7-10 feet and swim back to the starting point with both hands on the brick using legs only within 1 minute and 40 seconds; tread water for 2 minutes using only the legs.

Know, understand, and demonstrate personal characteristics associated with being a lifeguard. Know the benefits of regular exercise to prevent and respond to emergencies. Know the primary responsibilities of a professional lifeguard. Become familiar with the surveillance techniques a lifeguard is required to have and how the techniques can help prevent injury. Know and understand the EMS system. Part of the class is a required administrative fee of $50 required by the American Red Cross.

Instructional Methods:  Students will practice all skills determined by the American Red Cross program.  

Assessments:  Demonstrate competency in each critical skill taught in the course without guidance:  Lifeguarding, CPR, AED, and first aid. Correctly answer at least 80% of the questions on all written exams and water skills.

08004G36

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course does not satisfy the Physical Education requirement

This course is offered 4th term only.  It will include backpacking, conditioning, map and compass, survival skills, trust activities, team building, belaying skills, indoor climbing, outdoor cooking, low and high ropes, and hands-on activities. 

Instructional Methods:  A backpacking trip is offered in the spring.  The trip is offered to students at a cost.  

Assessments:  Group activities, daily participation, daily assignments, teacher observation.

08004G46

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course does not satisfy the Physical Education requirement

This course is offered 1st term only. It will include canoeing, kayaking, camping and outdoor cooking, a low ropes course, high ropes course, fishing, indoor climbing, and trust and team building activities. 

Instructional Methods: A camping trip is offered in the fall.  The trip is offered to students at a cost. 

Assessments:  Group activities, daily participation, daily assignments, teacher observation.

05008G13

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Students will understand the basic skills of ballet, modern, tap/rhythm, and jazz dance. Students will learn to create and participate in a dance performance. Students will participate in a fitness program that includes running, strength training, yoga, Pilates, Zumba and other activities. Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08002G56

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: Ability to skate recreationally

Students will know and apply the rules and strategies of team sports that are played on grass and ice. Sports played are: football, softball, soccer, Ultimate Frisbee, broomball, boot hockey, and soft puck hockey. Know principles of training necessary to improve fitness. Students must provide their own skates.  Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08052G12

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to empower girls through various activities to promote positive and healthy life long behaviors. Students will participate in a fitness program, including running, strength training, circuit training, kickboxing, yoga, Pilates, and Zumba. Students will learn about wellness issues affecting teens such as nutrition, sleep, hydration, and stress management. Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08002G26

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: None

Students will understand and apply the advanced rules and skills of basketball, volleyball, team handball, broomball, boot hockey, pickleball, badminton, floor hockey, and indoor soccer. Understand principles of training necessary to improve fitness. Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08002G46

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Students will understand and apply the advanced rules and skills of basketball, volleyball, broomball, team handball, pickleball, and floor hockey.  Understand principles of training necessary to improve fitness.  Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08003G12

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: None

Understand and apply the basic rules and skills of tennis, golf, archery, and badminton. Understand principles of training necessary to improve fitness. Understand the benefits of quality nutrition has on overall health. Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08002G16

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: None

Students will understand and apply the advanced rules and skills of softball, football, tennis, soccer, broomball, boot hockey, and Ultimate Frisbee. Understand principles of training necessary to improve fitness. Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08002G36

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

The students will know, understand, and apply the advanced rules and skills of softball, football, tennis, soccer, broomball, boot hockey, and ultimate Frisbee.  Students will understand the principles and training necessary to improve fitness.  Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08052G22

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: One Physical Education class that meets graduation requirements at EPHS.

Yoga focuses on the mind-body connection and flexibility while incorporating cardiovascular, strength and sport concepts. Students enrolled in Yoga will expect to engage in yoga practice 2-3 days per week. The other days of the week will be used to participate in cardiovascular fitness, strength and endurance training, Pilates, and other sport activities. Students will learn about wellness issues affecting teens and stress management strategies.

08011G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Students will understand and apply the advanced rules and skills of badminton, pickleball, and tennis. They will also know principles of training necessary to improve fitness level. Each student will also measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08013G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Students will learn the advanced rules of soccer. Students will practice the technical and tactical skills of the game of soccer. They will also know the principles of training necessary to improve their fitness level. Each student will be able to measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength. Students will spend much of their class time mastering the skills needed to play soccer at a higher level both defensively as well as attacking offensively. There will be a lot of drills and small sided games. The focus of this class is to become a more well-rounded player individually but more importantly a better team player.

08002G66

Prerequisite: None
Grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
Credits: 1

Students will participate in team sports at a beginner/recreational  level. Students will participate in developmental drills and games. Students will understand the basic rules and skills of a variety of both indoor and outdoor team sports. Students will understand principles of training necessary to improve fitness.  Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength.

08009G14

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Students will participate in cardio, core, upper and lower body strength activities throughout the term. The emphasis is on improving each student’s overall fitness and teaching each student how to develop a personal fitness plan. Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance and strength.

08003G22

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Understand and apply the rules and skills of archery, golf, table tennis, bowling, badminton, cross-country skiing, and snow-shoeing. Understand the benefits quality nutrition has on overall health. Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength. 

Note: Bowling field trips are an additional cost.

08003G33

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Winter Individual Sports I

This class involves the same activities as Winter Individual Sports I. These activities will involve higher skill development of each activity and further understanding of technique. Students will understand the benefits quality nutrition has on overall health. Each student will measure and evaluate personal fitness, endurance, and strength and design a personal fitness plan. Bowling field trips are an additional cost.

03054E12 / 03054E22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Biology A&B and Algebra I

Note: Students must register for both terms A & B.

Advanced Biology is designed for students with a great interest in biology who wish to expand their knowledge in the areas of human anatomy and physiology. Students pursuing a health related or medical career may be particularly interested in this class. In term A, living structures will be studied in depth from the cellular level through the macroscopic level; special emphasis is placed on malformations, malfunctions, and diseases. The integumentary, skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory and immune systems are covered. Mini-units are also done on medical terms, the history of medicine, and alternative forms of medicine. Term B continues our study of living structures as we learn about the respiratory, endocrine, urinary, reproductive, nervous, and special senses. In addition, an investigative research project related to a controversial issue in medicine is done as well as a formal lab write-up. Systematic dissection of a fetal pig occurs throughout both terms.

03058E12 / 03058E22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Biology A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A & B.

This two term course is offered in the spring. It introduces the student to the great variety of plants in the surrounding world and their significance both environmentally and economically. This course has a strong laboratory component and you must be ok with working outside and getting your hands dirty! Greenhouse work will be part of the course along with individual and/or group research. Numerous home landscaping and plant care topics will be covered.

03056E12 / 03056E22

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Biology (or Honors) A&B, AND Chemistry (or Honors) A&B

Note: If you took regular Biology, an “A” average in Biology is highly recommended. Students must register for both terms of the course.

College Credit Available

Advanced Placement Biology’s primary goal is to provide students with a challenging college level course and prepare the student for the national AP Biology Exam given in mid-May. Students enrolled in this course are encouraged to take the exam. Based on performance on the exam, students may be granted college credit and/or advanced placement at the discretion of the college or university. The course will include topics regularly covered in a college biology course for majors. The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and an appreciation of science as a process.

03106E12 / 03106E22

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Chemistry A&B or Honors Chemistry A&B and Pre-Calculus

Note: An “A” average in Chemistry or a “B” average in Honors Chemistry is highly recommended. Students must register for both terms of the course.

College Credit Available

This course is similar to a freshman college chemistry course and is designed to strengthen a student’s chemistry background. AP Chemistry will help prepare students who wish to take the AP Exam in May. Based on performance on the exam, students may be granted college credit and/or advanced placement at the discretion of the college or university. Course content in Term A includes: atoms, molecules, ions, solutions, gases, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular structure chemical bonding, liquids, and solids. Course content in Term B includes: chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base systems, oxidation- reduction, solutions and colloids, chemical thermodynamics, and complex ions.

Content is accessed in part through blended/online learning with elements of student control over time, place, path and/or pace. In addition content will also be acquired through peer learning, group work, and collaborative laboratory experiments. 

03003E12 / 03003E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

College Credit Available

Prerequisite: Two semesters of high school laboratory science, including life science and physical science, along with at least one year of algebra.

AP Environmental Science is an introductory college-level course in environmental science.  The class and exam focus on seven main topics: Earth Systems and Resources, The Living World, Populations, Land and Water Use, Energy Resources and Consumption, Pollution, and Global Change.  In this class you will explore and investigate the interrelationships of the natural world and analyze environmental problems, both natural and human-made. You’ll take part in laboratory investigations and field work.  Skills you will learn by taking this class include: 1. Explaining environmental concepts and processes; 2. Analyzing data, visual representations, and writings; 3. Applying quantitative methods in solving problems; 4. Proposing a solution for an environmental problem and supporting your idea with evidence; and 5. Analyzing a research study to identify a hypothesis. This course helps to prepare students interested in a possible career in the area of environmental science.

03155E12 / 03155E22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

College Credit Available

Prerequisite: Science 9, Honors Physics, Algebra II and enrollment in (or completion recommended) of Pre-Calc

Note: A "B" or better in Pre-Calc for the AP Physics 1 exam; Calculus suggested for the Physics C Mechanics exam

AP Physics is an introductory college-level physics course that completes the development of topics begun in or not treated in the Honors Physics course such as: constrained Newtonian systems, further development of Conservation Laws applied to energy and momentum of systems, Circular Motion, Center of Mass, Torque and Rotational Mechanics, Universal Law of Gravity and Orbital Motion. Through inquiry based learning and laboratory experiences, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills and also learn how to use multilevel physics problem solving approaches. Data analysis of mathematical models for experimental questions are also developed. Students will be prepared for either the AP Physics 1 Exam and/or those students who have had Calculus will be given calculus based problems topics to prepare for the AP Physics C mechanics exam.

03051B12 / 03051B22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Any 9th grade science

Note: Students must register for both Basic Biology A and B.

Basic Biology does not go into as much depth on selected topics as Biology.  

Biology A - this course presents introductory information and basic skills in the area of the characteristics of living things, the nature of science, ecology, cell structure and function, biochemistry, DNA, cell division, and protein synthesis.  

Biology B - this course presents introductory information and basic skills in the area of genetics, evolution, microbiology, biotechnology, animal behavior.

03101B12 / 03101B22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Science 9, Algebra I

Note: Students must register for both terms of the course.

Basic Chemistry is an introductory chemistry course where the amount of learning targets are different than that of Chemistry A and B. However the same essential learning targets are covered and students have the entire semester to demonstrate proficiency. If science is a difficult course for you, then basic chemistry would be a good fit. The first term of the course covers writing and naming formulas, identifying chemical reactions, and balancing chemical equations. The second term of the course covers basic mole calculations and drawing molecules.  Students will also have the opportunity of participating in a passion project during each term.

03159B12 / 03159B22

2 credits  |  9  |

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

Note: Students must register for both terms A & B.

Basic Physical Science 9 does not go into as much depth on selected topics as Physical Science 9. 

Basic Physical Science A—this course explores introductory chemistry concepts.  Major areas covered include measurements, atomic structure and periodicity, chemical bonding and formulas, as well as chemical reactions. Also covered in Basic Physical Science A are methods for conducting research and reporting on an individual experiment. 

Basic Physical Science B—this course explores introductory physics concepts.  Major areas covered include conversion of units, motion, forces, and energy. Also covered in Basic Physical Science B is a unit on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) concepts.

03051G12 / 03051G22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Any 9th grade Science

Note: Students must register for both Biology A and B.

Biology A - this course presents introductory information and basic skills in the area of ecology,, cell structure and function, biochemistry, DNA, cell division, and protein synthesis.  

Biology B - this course presents introductory information and basic skills in the area of genetics, evolution,, microbiology,, animal behavior, and biotechnology.

03101G12 / 03101G22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Science 9 and Algebra I

Note: Students must register for both terms. Successful completion of Chemistry A is required for continuation in term B.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the basic principles of chemistry. Students will study introductory principles; nomenclature, writing and balancing equations, atomic structure, bonding, solutions, stoichiometry, acid/base, and chemical analysis, along with an introduction into organic chemistry.

03101G12BL / 03101G22BL

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Science 9 and Algebra I

Note: Students must register for both terms. Successful completion of Chemistry A is required for continuation in term B.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the basic principles of chemistry. Students will study introductory principles; nomenclature, writing and balancing equations, atomic structure, bonding, solutions, stoichiometry, acid/base, and chemical analysis, along with an introduction into organic chemistry.

Blended / Hybrid courses are designed and delivered by EPHS staff. They offer a mix of face to face and online instruction.  Course content has elements of student control over time, place, path and/or pace with the goal of affording each student a more personalized learning experience.

03051E12 / 03051E22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Physical Science A&B or Honors Physical Science 9 A&B

Note: A “B+” average in Honors Physical Science 9 or an “A” average in Physical Science 9 is highly recommended. Students must register for BOTH Honors Biology A & B.

 

This is an accelerated Biology course.  Although course topics are similar to that of Biology A & B, the rigor and depth of each of those concepts is elevated. Topics of study include: biotechnology, cell structure and function, biochemistry, DNA, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, evolution, microbiology, animal behavior, and ecology.

Students enrolling in this course should be self-motivated and thrive on academic challenge. Course content is accessed in part through blended/online learning with elements of student control over time, place, path and/or pace.

03101E12 / 03101E22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Science 9 and Geometry

Note: Students must register for both terms of the course. Successful completion of term A is required for continuation in term B.

In this course chemical principles will be approached in depth and with more of a mathematical approach. Course content includes: atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions, energy, kinetics, equilibrium, solutions, acid/base, nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. It is designed for students who are more abstract thinkers, have a strong math background, and are possibly considering taking college chemistry or majoring in a STEM related field.

Content is accessed in part through blended/online learning with elements of student control over time, place, path and/or pace. In addition content will also be acquired through peer learning, group work, and collaborative laboratory experiments.

03159E12 / 03159E22

2 credits  |  9  |

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Note: An “A” average in Algebra I is highly recommended. Students must register for both terms A & B.

Honors Physical Science 9 A&B is taught at a faster pace, goes into more depth on selected topics, and looks at some topics with a higher math emphasis than the other Physical Science 9 courses.

Honors Physical Science A—this course explores introductory chemistry concepts.  Major areas covered include measurements, atomic structure and periodicity, chemical bonding and formulas, as well as chemical reactions.  Also covered in Honors Physical Science A are methods for conducting research and reporting on an individual experiment.

Honors Physical Science B—this course explores introductory physics concepts. Major areas covered include conversion of units, motion, forces, and energy.  Also covered in Honors Physical Science B is a unit on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) concepts.

03151E12 / 03151E22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Science 9, Algebra II and enrollment in/or completion of Pre-Calculus

Note: This course is a necessary prerequisite for the AP Physics course. A grade of "B" or better in Algebra II is suggested. Students must register for both terms.

In this course the core concepts of physics will be developed using both conceptual and mathematical models based on lab investigations, demonstrations, activities, discussion, and problem solving. The course is specifically designed for students who have a strong interest and background in science and math and will be pursuing further training in science, math, medicine or engineering at college. Most colleges and major universities recommend the completion of a physics course for admission. If you are considering a science related career, you should seriously consider taking Honors Physics. This course is a preparation for some but not all of the learning targets for the AP Physics 1 and the AP Physics C mechanics exam.

03159G12 / 03159G22

2 credits  |  9  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Students must register for both terms A & B.

Physical Science A—this course primarily explores introductory chemistry concepts. Major areas covered include atomic structure and periodicity, chemical bonding and formulas, as well as chemical reactions. Also covered in Physical Science A are methods for conducting and reporting on an individual experiment.

Physical Science B—this course primarily explores introductory physics concepts. Major areas covered include conversion of units, motion, forces, and energy.  Also covered in Physical Science B is a unit on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) concepts.

03151G12 / 03151G22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Science 9 and Geometry

Note: Students must register for both terms.

Physics is designed to give students an introduction to the basic concepts of physics such as forces and motion, energy relationships, electricity and magnetism, waves, sound, light, color, etc. Most liberal arts colleges and major universities recommend the completion of a physics course for admission. This course focuses on the everyday applications of physics all around you, and helps you answer the common question of ‘How things work’.

NEW

03212G12 / 03212G22

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Science Research and Design is a course that will allow students to explore a science topic of their interest in depth. The course will involve rigorous scientific study from the identification of a problem, investigation design, data collection, data analysis, and conclusions drawn from the research. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and other background sources while learning to synthesize information from these multiple sources, develop their own perspectives and write a 5-10 page scientific paper to share their findings with science faculty.

04162G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This is a course on criminal law and justice in the United States. It is designed to give students an exposure to the law and the American legal system considering the perspective of the individuals involved - including accused criminals, litigants, prosecutors, judges and jury members. Topics within the course will include, but not be limited to, state and federal court systems, criminal and civil law, ethics and values, and an exploration of the history of and current issues around justice, law, and the legal system in the United States.

04158E12

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the 2nd half of the World History graduation requirement for Social Studies.

College Credit Available

This class introduces students to major themes and concepts in political science and examines the governments and politics of the United Kingdom, Russia, China, Mexico, Nigeria, and Iran.  Specifically, the class focuses upon the following themes:  a) sources of public authority and political power; b) the citizen and the state; c) types of regimes and scope of government activity; and d) internal and external sources of political change.  Special focus is placed on the current political and economic issues of these countries.  To successfully complete this course, critical thinking, reasoned judgment and substantial reading are required on a daily basis.  This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Exam in May of each year and fulfills the second half of the Minnesota State World History requirement.

04205E11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Algebra II

Note: Fulfills the EPHS Econ/Social Studies and Business graduation requirement.

College Credit Available

AP Economics is a semester-long, two-credit course combining AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics, preparing students for both AP exams. It offers students a more immersive and expansive economics experience and the opportunity to engage in class community over a semester. The course focuses on the decision making of individuals, businesses, and the government.

Students will study a variety of economic theories and issues, analyze their practical application to the real world, and improve their personal, professional, and civic decision-making skills. Particular emphasis is placed on the operation of product and factor markets; distributions of income; market failure; the role of government in promoting efficiency, equity, and growth in the economy; gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation determination; fiscal and monetary policies; and international trade and foreign exchange markets. This course may be taught by any combination of Social Studies and/or Business teachers.

04004E11

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the 9th grade graduate requirement for social studies in its entirety and is to be taken in place of Human Geography 9 and Democratic Foundations.

College Credit Available

AP Human Geography 9 is a two-term course that focuses on the processes and cause and effect relationships of human populations. Emphasis throughout the course is on the arrangement of patterns and conditions across the Earth’s surface, differences in scale, and cultural determinants influenced by global interaction and integration. Major themes of study include globalization, diffusion, integration, and interaction. This class covers a significant quantity of material at a very quick pace. As a result, students should possess both a strong reading ability and broad vocabulary skills. In addition, students should demonstrate fluid and analytical writing and discerning critical thinking skills. The units covered will include:

  • Nature and perspectives of Geography
  • Population and Migration
  • Cultural Patterns and Processes
  • Political Organization of Space
  • Agricultural and Rural Land Use
  • Industrialization and Economic Development
  • Cities and Urban Land

04204E11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the Economics graduation requirement for Social Studies.

College Credit Available

How’s the economy doing? How do we know? What can a government do to fix a bad economy? Should they? What are the issues with a high national debt? How big of an issue is it? These are such questions this college-level course in macroeconomics will consider and students will be able to offer insight grounded in scholarly study. This course places particular emphasis on the study of gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation, and also develops students’ familiarity with the financial sector, fiscal and monetary policies, economic growth, international trade policies, and currency value determination. Moreover, students will be able to utilize macroeconomic theory and thinking skills to evaluate the roles a federal government and central bank play in a nation’s economy. This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement exam.

04256E11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

College Credit Available

The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatments of psychological disorders, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.

04159E12

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the US Government graduation requirement for Social Studies.

College Credit Available

The AP US Government course provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality. Specifically the course covers the Constitutional Foundations, Political Theory and Beliefs, Development of Political Parties, Elections, Interest Groups and the Mass Media, the Formal Institutions of Government and Public Policy, and lastly Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

04104E13 / 04104E23 / 04104E33

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the US History graduation requirement for Social Studies. Students must register for all terms.

An “A” in Democratic Foundations and Human Geography, or completion of AP Human Geography. Additionally students must possess exceptional academic skills, the ability to persist in the face of intense and enduring rigor, and possess a deep, genuine interest in U.S. History.

College Credit Available

This course is equivalent to demands made by full-year introductory college courses in U.S. history.  Students learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship.  Students develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. The class details the development of the United States from pre-settlement through the present day. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Exam in May of each school year. This course fulfills the State of Minnesota high school American History requirement. Summer assignment is required.

04057E11

Prerequisite: None

Note: This is a two-term course that fulfills the entire graduation requirement for World History.

College Credit Available

AP World History: Modern is an introductory college-level modern world history course. Students cultivate their understanding of world history from c. 1200 CE to the present through analyzing historical sources and learning to make connections and craft historical arguments as they explore concepts like humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation.

Students will read college-level materials for main ideas, analyze, synthesize, identify bias, and determine cause and effect. This class covers a significant quantity of material at a college level. Therefore, students should possess both a strong reading ability and broad vocabulary skills. In addition, students must demonstrate fluid and analytical writing and discerning critical thinking skills.  Emphasis placed on critical thinking skills will include analysis and interpretation of historical events and documents.

04065G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

From the Archduke Franz Ferdinand to that fateful day in Dallas 1963, it’s undeniable that few events in history have a more immediate transformational impact than assassinations. This course will analyze notable assassinations, their impact, and historical significance in the United States and world. Among the assassinations discussed will be Abraham Lincoln, John F. Kennedy, James Garfield, William McKinley, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X along with some of the “almosts” such as Teddy Roosevelt, George Wallace, and Ronald Reagan.

04158E22 / 04159E22

Prerequisite: None
Grade(s): 11, 12
Credits: 2

Note: This course fulfills the graduation requirements for both the 2nd half World History requirement and the U.S. Government requirement for Social Studies.

College Credit Available

The student that sign up for this combined course will take both AP U.S. Government and AP Comparative Politics (see course descriptions above) on an every-other-day basis covering two terms. This combined course will offer the student additional enrichment opportunities such as books and salons that only an extended time format allows. This unique course gives students the opportunity to compare and contrast the American government with the international political systems covered in AP Comparative Politics. In addition, the overlap in course content and themes makes this combination a natural fit.

04161G11

1 credit | 9 |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course, in addition to Human Geography 9, fulfills the 9th grade graduation requirement for Social Studies.

This course in civics focuses on student critical thinking skills within the context of the development, establishment and continuation of the American political system. Students learn about the rights and obligations of citizenship at the local, state, and national levels. Topics include: the three branches of government, relationships in government, amending the Constitution, and current issues in American democracy, as well as around the world. All students will access rigorous course content by engaging in simulations, debates, small & large group discussions, online learning, and analysis of current issues. Students will read material that is often above grade level. 

04160G11

1 credit  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the Economics graduation requirement for Social Studies.

In a world of scarce resources, how is it determined what goods and services are made and who gets what? What causes an economy to do well or to fall into a recession? What is the proper role of government in managing economic issues and outcomes? In Economics and Public Policy, students will learn about price determination and markets,, income inequality, economic growth, inflation, unemployment, international trade issues, and government budget deficits and the national debt.  Additionally, the course provides a unified framework to address these issues by studying the impact of different policies, such as monetary and fiscal policies, on aggregate behavior. Students will utilize the tools and theory of economics to analyze and create solutions to public policy issues, both in the United States and around the world.

04001G11

1 credit  |  9  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course, in addition to Democratic Foundations, fulfills the 9th grade graduation requirement for Social Studies.

Geography is divided into two main branches. Physical geography is the scientific study of natural features on the Earth’s surface. Human Geography studies the interrelationships between people, place, and environment. In this course, students will examine the culture, population, politics, urbanization, and agricultural practices in human societies. Project-based learning will provide choices and opportunities for each student to become more conscious-minded and culturally aware global citizens. In addition, students will read, research, and interpret information in order to understand the relationships between cultures, critically analyze events that have led to our existing societies, and offer creative solutions to current world issues.

04254G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course offers a hands-on exploration of human behavior and mental processes. Pioneering and contemporary theories of psychology are studied and then applied to everyday situations. Mental illness, personality development, sleep / dreams, hypnosis / meditation, subliminal messages, sensory illusions, ESP, learning, and the brain are just a few of the topics that are examined. Active classroom experiments, demonstrations, and thoughtful discussion are all classroom tools used to better understand the science of human behavior.

04108G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Ever wondered what makes something “feminine” in one culture but “masculine” in another? Are men really better at reading maps and women better at multi-tasking? Are the brains of men and women different? In this class we will study topics such as gender in sports, gender issues and inequalities around the globe, gender and the media, gender and bias, and ”brains, bodies & the binary”. By examining popular makings of masculinity, femininity, and sexuality we hope to broaden our “gender perspective” beyond traditional notions of femininity and masculinity. This class is an introduction to the emerging theories of gender fluidity around the world as it intersects with race, ethnicity, sexuality, policy, and culture.

Students will engage with course content in part through blended/online learning that includes elements of student control over time, place, path and/or pace as well as group discussions/debate, hands on activities, and self-reflection.

04258G12

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course will help students gain a new understanding of human behavior and social relationships that apply in everyday life. Students will be introduced to the major sociological perspectives, as well as other basic concepts of sociology including; socialization, cultural norms, symbolic culture, sex & gender in society, class, race, and ethnicity. 

Methods that will be used to help students gain a better understanding of human behavior and social interactions include: blended/online learning that includes elements of student control over time, place, path and/or pace as well as large and small group discussions, hands on activities, speakers and self-reflection.

04061G11

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course surveys the main political, social, economic, and intellectual currents of the broader Middle East during the 20th and 21st centuries. Areas of focus include Israel and the Palestinian territories, the Arab world, Turkey, and the rise of ISIS. Course emphasis is placed on answering fundamental questions regarding the historical background and development of current problems in the region. How has the region been formed and shaped by colonialism, political Islam, democratization, oil, revolution, and war? What are the core issues of regional conflicts and why has peace been so elusive? What are the possible outcomes of the ongoing turmoil unleashed by reform movements during the Arab Spring? Components of the course include current events analysis, debate and discussion, lecture, and an Israeli-Palestinian peace plan proposal.

04151G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the US Government graduation requirement for Social Studies.

In US Government & Politics, students learn and grow into informed members of the electorate capable of influencing the choices of local, state, and national governments. Students will analyze the Constitution and Bill of Rights in order to define their personal liberties and responsibilities in the United States. Additionally, students will study the role of the United States in the global community through an examination of historical trends and an analysis of current events. Most importantly, students will develop a personalized view of the political world and learn how to impact their communities as critical thinkers and engaged citizens.

04103G12 / 04103G22

2 credits  |  10  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the US History graduation requirement for Social Studies. Students must register for both terms.

This course is a thematic look at United States History from the early 1800’s through present day.  Unit topics include: American identity, expansionism, Constitution in crisis, role of the federal government and United States and the world. This course fulfills the State of Minnesota high school American History requirements.

04058G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the 1st half of the World History graduation requirement for Social Studies

World History I: Ancient to 1400 provides a comprehensive study of the development of civilization to the Middle Ages in Europe. This course will compare the emergence and development of cultures in all parts of the world including Africa, Asia, and the Western hemisphere. Students will analyze the geographic, economic, political, cultural, religious, and social systems that have emerged and influenced thought and behavior patterns in various cultures today. Topics include Prehistory, Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Africa, Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages.

04053G11

1 credit  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: This course fulfills the 2nd half of the World History graduation requirement for Social Studies.

World History II: 1400 to Modern is a comprehensive study of the development of civilization from the 1400’s to the rise of modern nationalism, imperialism, and revolutions that impacted the modern world.  The course will compare how cultures in all parts of the world including Africa, Asia and the Western hemisphere have adapted to an industrialized, interdependent world. Students in this course will analyze the various ways cultures adapt to change and the major influences that formulate the modern world.

1 credit/term | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

This course is designed for students to develop transitional academic and life skills. Specific course content will address individual student needs. Areas will include communication, community based learning and problem solving skills.

0.5 credit/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

Students review real numbers, multi-step equations and inequalities, linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, simplifying exponents and radicals, operations with polynomial expressions, and factoring. Problem solving and reasoning skills will be emphasized in every unit. Students will also learn how to apply algebraic functions into real life situations and how to translate these skills into other areas of their life. Students will be scheduled into this course by the special education team using multiple data points.

1 credit/term  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualified placement

The Career Investigation class stems from the 5 areas of the PAES Lab. After researching and studying a particular career, students will interview someone in the community of that position and find out more about the job. By the end of the semester, students will have been to eight different job sites. Students will have a better understanding about the jobs they might be interested in, what skills they need to do them, and what kind of education-/ training they will need.

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

College & Career Readiness Transition will support students in preparing for life after high school by learning employment, independent living, and post-secondary planning skills. It addresses the essential learning targets of self-advocacy, employment, post-secondary training, independent work skills, organization, and independent living skills. Students will receive direct instruction in these skills, time to practice the skills, check-ins, and some time scheduled for support in course work.

1 credit/term  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualified placement

This class will focus on different places in the community (i.e. grocery store, movie theater, library) each week. Curriculum will be focused on appropriate behavior, communication, safety, planning, and money. By the end of the semester, students will have learned and possibly visited eight different locations around the community.

1 credit  |  9  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualified placement

This class will focus on communicating with peers, adults, strangers, employers, and people who could be encountered in the community. Students will explore appropriate ways to ask for the things they need, learn to advocate for themselves (especially when they have a problem), and practice a variety of communication skills. Students will explore the meaning of non- verbal as well as verbal cues.

1 credit/term  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement
Grade(s): 12
Credits: 1/term

This course is designed to increase functional math and literacy skills for students with a variety of learning styles, unique needs and special interests using technology, multi media and hands on project based activities. Students will solve real world math problems and engage in collaborative discussions with an emphasis on social skills needed for transition. Curriculum content will focus on comprehension, vocabulary, writing and research.

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement
Grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
Credits: 2

This course is individualized and designed to build students’ reading and writing skills. Reading skills include: comprehension, vocabulary, and understanding elements of literature. Writing skills include: summarizing, analyzing, organization, and editing. Students will be scheduled into this course by the special education team using multiple data points.

1 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

This course is designed to build individual student's literacy and math skills. Literacy curriculum will focus on comprehension, vocabulary, reading fluency, and accurately using words and phrases to write sentences. Math curriculum will focus on solving real world mathematical problems with an emphasis on basic math skills, money, time, and measurement.

0.5 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

This course is an individualized math class designed to meet students at their instructional level and assist them in developing basic math skills using direct instruction and through ALEKS, an online math system. The focus is on building a strong arithmetic foundation with some use of calculators. Curriculum levels can range from basic facts, calculations and word problems up to pre-algebra. The intent of this course is to accelerate individual student progress. Students will be scheduled into this course by the special education team using multiple data points.

1 credit/term  |  9  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

This course is designed to increase skills in the areas of social communications as well as identifying emotions, stress management and self-advocacy. Through classroom discussion, using technology, role play, and hands on projects students will also focus on a specific content area at each grade level. Some students will use class time to participate in sensory activities and yoga exercises.

1 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualified placement

This course will promote student independence in everyday living situations with appropriate social skills to be successful. The course will focus on personal management, life management, and everyday life skills. Supplemental skills will be added to meet the specific needs of the students.

1 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement
Grade(s): 9, 10
Credits: 1/term

This course is designed to build individual students’ literacy and math skills. Literacy curriculum will focus on comprehension, vocabulary, reading fluency, and accurately using words and phrases to write sentences. Math curriculum will focus on solving real-world mathematical problems with an emphasis on basic math skills, money, time, and measurement.

0.5 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

The intent of this course is to accelerate individual student progress with the goal of supporting students to successfully enter Algebra. The course covers whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, proportions, percent, variable expressions and equations, functions and graphs, exponents and polynomials, and basic geometry. It provides key foundational computation skills while providing rich, grade-level problem solving experiences. A main focus of this course is the introduction of Algebraic concepts. Students will be scheduled into this course by the special education team using multiple data points.

0.5 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

PROJECT SUCCESS will support the student transition from middle school to high school by learning school readiness skills. It addresses the essential learning targets of self-advocacy, independent work skills, organization, and independent living. Students will receive direct instruction in these skills, time to practice the skills, check-ins, and some time scheduled for support in course work.

1 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: referral and qualifying placement

This is a two term course with physical and life science curriculums presented in alternating years. This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to increase their understanding of the physical world around them through a modified science curriculum. Students will learn about many different units and areas of science (Technology, Environments, Electricity, Natural Disasters, Weather, Mammals, Biomes and science inquiry). Students will also work on improving comprehension and problem solving skills.

1 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |

Prerequisite: referral and qualifying placement
Grade(s): 9, 10
Credits: 1/term

Social Studies 9/10 is a course on a two year cycle. Students learn about our country's history starting with explorers in the 1400's to present time. In year one of the course, students will begin with explorers to the beginning of the Civil War. In year two of the course, students will learn and explore after the Civil War to present time.

1 credit  |  11  |

Prerequisite: referral and qualifying placement

Social Studies 11 is a course on a two year cycle. Students learn about Citizenship in the year 1 cycle, including how the civic identity of the United States is shaped by historical figures, places and events, and by key foundational documents and other symbolically important artifacts. During the year 2 cycle, students will learn that he United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels (federal, state, local) and the three branches (legislative, executive, judicial) of government.

0.5 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

Social Understanding and Readiness Skills will support students in understanding social norms in the school and community settings, develop problem solving skills and improve their self-advocacy and self-control. The course will also develop skills to help students in the areas of post-secondary education, independent living and employment. Students will receive direct instruction in these skills, time to practice the skills, check-ins, and some time scheduled for support in course work.

0.5 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

The Strategic Learning Center will support students in the development of their social-emotional and transition skills. It addresses the essential learning targets of self-awareness, social awareness, self-management, social management, post-secondary training and independent work skills. Students will receive direct instruction in these skills and be provided time to practice skills.

0.5 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: referral and qualifying placement

Study Skills will support students in developing executive functioning skills (organization, self-advocacy, and work completion) and encourage the use of these skills outside of Resource Room setting in the school, home and community. Students will receive direct instruction in these skills, time to practice the skills, check-ins, and some time scheduled for support in course work.

1 credit/term  |  11  |

Prerequisite: referral and qualifying placement

This course is designed to increase functional math and literacy skills for students with a variety of learning styles, unique needs and special interests using technology, multi-media and hands on project based activities. Students will solve real world math problems and engage in collaborative discussions with an emphasis on social skills. Curriculum content will focus on comprehension, vocabulary, writing and research.

21008A12 / 21008A22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Robotics and Automation

Note: This is a semester course

This course is designed to teach students about applied logic, which introduces them to the basics of digital input and output systems AKA “Robotics”. Are you inventive? Do you enjoy developing solutions?  Are you interested in expanding your computer science abilities? Our everyday lives are impacted by automation from your home heating system to advanced automation and robotic processes to produce food, cars, and control other high-tech systems. In this course students will be introduced to the binary numbering system and basic logic gates to create combination logic projects such as an automated temperature-controlled fireplace, automated elevator system, random dice generator and students have the opportunity to customize their projects. This course blends theoretical and hands on learning and offers the opportunity to test for college credit.

17006E22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Woodcrafting

Note: Meets Applied Arts requirement. Must sign up for both terms.

Articulated College Credit Available

A desk, entertainment center, chest of drawers, cedar chest are just a few ideas of the projects that can be designed and built in this course. The choice is yours!  What do you want to learn to build? This course is for students who have shown interest and skill in woodworking or have interest in construction/ cabinetry or architecture careers. The student will research cabinet design while learning standard kitchen cabinet designs, sizes, and materials. Students will learn to create a  plan of working procedure, a bill of materials creating estimates of costs, and flow charts of production and deadlines. The course includes cabinetry advanced processes; crown molding, base cabinets, laminate countertops, dovetail drawers, cabinet hardware and more.   This course is articulated with Hennepin Technical College for 2 credits.

05167G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Meets Fine Arts requirement

In this course, you'll develop an understanding of digital cameras and darkroom exposure. Students will develop skills with a digital SLR camera learning the effects and functions of camera settings while learning the rules of impactful camera photography. Students will learn to manipulate images in Adobe Photoshop to create different types of prints, clean up images and develop skills in printing to vinyl, canvas, photo paper, ceramics, metal, wood and more! Students will learn the basics of darkroom exposure developing processes while creating photograms. Included in this course will be learning enlarging techniques, printmaking with 5 different printers, and other unique camera created effects.

21052G25 / 20152G35

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Engineering Manufacturing - Metal Work

Note: This is a semester course. Meets Applied Arts requirement

Using skills developed from the Engineering Manufacturing-Metal Work course students will be creating an engineering design brief to design and fabricate their own personal metal work project. Students will use computer aided drafting to design and present their ideas, develop cost projections, learn machine coding, and fabricate their projects with the opportunity to develop skill mastery using industry standard machining, welding, and metal part fabrication. Recommended for students interested in engineering and technical trades skills.

21052G15

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Research & Design

A machine-based metals class that teaches the fundamental processes of working with metals and composites. Students will acquire useful techniques of tool usage, machining, manufacturing, welding, and fabrication skills. Students will learn to use industry-based machines; Horizontal Mill, Plasma Cutter, Lathe, Mig welder, and the use of hand power tools while following blueprints in the creation of thread gauge plates, mill mazes, plasma cut name plate and more! This course is highly recommended for any student considering further work/study in the fields of Engineering, Manufacturing, or Fabrication.

05167E11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Meets Fine Arts requirement

How did they get that picture on that??? This class will explore graphic design technologies in the digital world of advertising. Students will learn how advertising uses graphics to communicate their messages to different audiences. Students will learn different printer resolutions and how to use them, image file sizes, and digital organizing. Through the use of the Adobe Creative Cloud students will learn the elements of design and how to use  Photoshop/Illustrator Suite of software to create effective advertisements and packaging. Students will create products with the use of a laser cutter & engraver, vinyl cutter, thermal presses and 5 different printers. Products designed and created include: large format poster prints, vinyl sticker making, laser engraved wood photos, thermal and vinyl press T-shirts/apparel, ceramic coffee mugs, water bottles, puzzles, key chains, and more!

21006A12 / 21006A22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Must take A & B in the same school year (College Credit course upon completion of Part B). Meets Applied Arts requirement

College Credit Available

Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) is the starting point for students who are interested in becoming an engineer. See if you have what it takes to create the next great invention. In this class, you will learn how to efficiently design solutions to problems, create the solution on the computer and compete against other groups to see whose solution is the best. If you are looking at getting a head start on an engineering degree this class is a great opportunity, not only do you learn valuable skills you can also receive 3 elective university credits.

If students pass the course at 85% average for the year and the college final at 70% they are eligible for 3 college credits.

21004A12 / 21004A22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Intro to Engineering Design

Note: Must sign up for both A & B in the same year.

College Credit Available

Project Lead the Way is a nationally recognized course that helps students understand the field of engineering and engineering technologies. Exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes help students learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology in an engineering problem solving process to benefit people. The course also includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological change. Are you interested in green technologies, electric/hybrid car technologies or finding the next solution to saving the planet? This course will show you how to fully develop those ideas in Engineering industry standards. This class also offers the opportunity to earn college credit with the completion of part B. Part A and B must be taken in the same year.

21052G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Meets Applied Arts requirement

This course is designed to teach manufacturing and fabrication in the woods, metals, and automation careers.  Students begin by learning to create an Engineering Design Brief while designing their projects. Students will develop beginning woodworking skills using table top machines while constructing a small clock or coat rack. Automation and design are introduced through Corel Draw software and the laser engraver projects of choice while learning Vector and Raster equipment set ups. Students will learn to read and create industry standard blueprints and how to read them. This course is a great introduction to all areas of the technology education courses.

21012A12

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to many aspects of residential architecture and provides an opportunity for students to develop a single-family home. Are you wondering how you can use your creative talents?  Are you interested in transforming livable spaces and interior design? Understanding the design and construction (how homes are built) is essential to building and remodeling homes so people will purposely enjoy their spaces.  Students will also investigate the environmental impact, cost of construction, heat\ cooling, and electrical and plumbing systems. Students will develop sets of technical drawings which include a floor plan, front and side elevations, wall sections, window & door schedules, and multiplies 3D renderings. Students will apply a combination of hands-on model building and CAD designs throughout the course.

 

17101G11

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to develop fundamental skills of robotics, automation, and electronics. Students will begin learning standard C programming language, and how to write simple and complex programs. Students will then use the materials provided to build simple and complex structures that they will program to complete design challenges. Going further, students will work in teams to create a classroom automation challenge. Also, through these hands-on projects, students learn proper hand tool and equipment use.

17006G12

1 credit  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Meets Applied Arts requirement

This is a traditional woodworking class. Students will build a solid hardwood cabinet that when completed they can take home. Students will create a set of plans for building their wood project, generate a bill of materials with specifications, construct a project from the plans, and demonstrate safe usage of woodworking tools and machines. During the term students will learn how to use hand tools, power equipment, and fundamental woodshop practices including drawer and door construction.

NEW

23998X22 

1-2 credits/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Community Employment Seminar

This course offers an employment opportunity in the local community. Work experience teachers will help students taking this course in several ways, including finding job placements related to their goals and interests, coordinating transportation (if necessary), and assisting with job-related troubleshooting once placed at a jobsite. Students will receive guidance and support from their work experience teachers for the duration of the course.

NEW

23998X12 

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to help you make a successful transition from school to work and will include topics related to post-secondary education and professional training, career readiness, work safety, labor laws, employability skills, and employee earnings and benefits. Opportunities to build career awareness and develop critical thinking, decision-making, and on-the-job problem solving are also primary components of the course. This course is the prerequisite to participating in the Community Employment Experience.

1 credit/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite:  EPHS Employment Seminar

This course offers a paid or unpaid experience within EPHS. Job experiences will occur in the staff mailroom, media center, delivery dock, dish room, kitchen, and commons areas.  Basic work skills are applied, improved, and evaluated for future community placement. Students will follow the same expectations and etiquette that community businesses have for their employees, as this course is designed to lead to a community employment experience.

1 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

This course is designed to prepare students for an initial work experience. Topics related to finding and keeping a job will be the major points of emphasis throughout the course. Students will receive a broad overview of many key concepts related to workplace success, including punctuality, attendance, teamwork, communication, and advocacy.  School staff will utilize employee handbooks and real-life examples to reinforce the importance of these essential skills.

0.5 credit/term  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

Prepare for your future! Through this class, students will develop functional work skills through classroom activities and early employment experiences. Topics of focus include: teamwork, punctuality, communication skills (verbal and non-verbal), following instructions (one-step, multiple steps, written, and verbal) and workplace reading and math.

12108B12 / 12108B22

1 credit  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None    

 It’s all about YOUR money!  You will learn what you really need to know about handling your finances.  Learn about budgeting, banking, insurance needs, tax preparation, credit, making large purchases, and more tips to help you manage your hard-earned money.

1 credit/term  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Referral and qualifying placement

The PAES (Practical Assessment Exploration System) program provides training in both employment and independent living skills. In this simulated work environment, students learn basic career skills, practice independence and advocacy, and discover. their interests in specific work areas and their job strengths. Curriculum focus is in 5 work areas: Business/Marketing, Computer/Technology, Construction/ Industrial, Processing/Production, and Consumer Service.

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite:  Referral  and qualifying placement    

This semester course includes classroom instruction and hands-on work-based experiences. The objective is for students to acquire a basic understanding of the skills required to perform a variety of tasks in several entry-level service occupations, including food preparation assistant, dining room attendant, dish room worker, laundry room worker, custodial aide, and outdoor grounds maintenance.

 

1 credit/term  |  12  | 

Prerequisite: Referral and qualified placement

This class builds on the same learning targets from social communication 9 and continues to focus on communicating with peers, adults, strangers, employers, and people who could be encountered in the community.  Students will continue to explore appropriate ways to ask for the things they need, learn to advocate for themselves (especially when they have a problem), and practice a variety of communication skills.  Students will explore the meaning of non-verbal as well as verbal cues.

1 credit  |  12  |

Prerequisite: referral and qualifying placement

Social Studies 12 is a course on a two year cycle. Students learn about Citizenship in the year 1 cycle, including how the civic identity of the United States is shaped by historical figures, places and events, and by key foundational documents and other symbolically important artifacts. During the year 2 cycle, students will learn that he United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels (federal, state, local) and the three branches (legislative, executive, judicial) of government.

NEW

06106E12 / 06106E22 

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Spanish spoken in the home

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

This course is designed for students who speak Spanish in the home and/or are fluent Spanish speakers. In this course, students are able to develop their linguistic ability in association with their written and comprehensive skills. Furthermore, emphasis is also placed on the subjects of communication and Latin American history. This course prepares students for the Bilingual Seal exam, in which they can earn college credit.

06108G14 / 06108G24

2 credits  |  9  |

Prerequisite: Spanish Language Arts 8 AND Grade 8 teacher recommendation

This course is designed for Spanish immersion students entering high school with attention to enhanced literacy, pronunciation, writing skills, grammar polish, cultural awareness of Spanish speaking countries and transition to Advanced Spanish Immersion 4 and the rigor of college-level courses that follow.

06108G34 / 06108G44

2 credits  |  10  |

Prerequisite: Advanced Spanish Immersion 3

 

This course is designed for continuing Spanish immersion students at the high school level, who have successfully completed Advanced Spanish Immersion 3 , with attention to enhanced literacy, pronunciation, writing skills, grammar polish, and cultural awareness of Spanish speaking countries and transition to the rigor of college level courses to follow.

06109E11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Spanish 6 / SPAN 1004

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

College Credit Available

Students read and analyze Spanish literature from various Spanish speaking countries. The historical period spans from medieval to modern times. In the course students continue to develop proficiencies across the full range of the modes of communication (interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive), honing their critical reading and analytical writing skills. Besides reading, students study the historical context in which the work was made, and they analyze how historical context affects perspective and style of the work. Part of the course requires students to analyze in writing their observations of theme, style, and historical influences on the work. There are 1-2 hours of homework for the course each night, weekly assessments to monitor progress and periodic writing assessments.

06801G12 / 06801G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

Students will learn the basics for communication with deaf individuals. ASL is a visual language and requires participants to maintain eye contact while communicating. The course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary, basic rules of grammar, finger spelling, conversational behaviors, and various aspects of Deaf culture. Receptive and expressive sign vocabulary building, introductory conversation, and short narratives are featured.

06802G12 / 06802G22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: American Sign Language 1 A&B - a grade of “C” or better is recommended

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

Students will continue to learn communication with deaf individuals. The course includes more advanced receptive and expressive activities, sign vocabulary, ASL grammatical structure, finger spelling, conversational behaviors, and various aspects of Deaf culture. Receptive and expressive sign vocabulary building, conversations, short stories and narratives are featured.

06803G12 / 06803G22

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: American Sign Language 2 A&B - a grade of “C” or better is recommended.

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B

Students will continue to learn how to communicate with deaf individuals. The course includes advanced receptive and expressive activities, advanced sign vocabulary, sophisticated ASL grammatical structures, conversation behaviors, and various aspects of Deaf culture.

06401G12 / 06401G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

This course is designed for students with little or no background in the target language. (To strengthen skills before Level 2, this course is also recommended for students who earned less than 75% in 7th & 8th grade.) The major emphasis in this course will be on the development of listening and speaking skills. Students will also begin to read and write using basic language structures and investigate relevant cultural traditions.

06402G12 / 06402G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Chinese 1 A&B or two years of 7th & 8th grade language study (recommended grade of 75% or higher), or teacher recommendation

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B

In this semester long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for simple communication in varied applications. In the target language, they will comprehend spoken and written information (including the use of Chinese characters in Chinese II) and communicate simple information. In addition, students will recognize and identify relevant cultural traditions.

06403G12 / 06403G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Chinese 2 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

In this semester-long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for basic communication in varied applications. In the target language, students will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate basic information. They will continue to recognize and identify relevant cultural traditions.

06404G12 / 06404G22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Chinese 3 A&B

In this semester-long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for communication in more complicated applications. In the target language, they will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate more complicated information. They will continue to recognize relevant cultural traditions.

06405E12 / 06405E22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Chinese 4 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

In this semester-long course, students will learn the features of language necessary for communication in more complicated applications. In Chinese, they will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate complex information. They will read and write Chinese characters and recognize Chinese cultural traditions.

06121G12 / 06121G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

This course is designed for students with little or no background in the target language. (To strengthen skills before Level 2, this course is also recommended for students who earned less than 75% in 7th & 8th grade.) The major emphasis in this course will be on the development of listening and speaking skills. Students will also begin to read and write using basic language structures and investigate relevant cultural traditions. 

06122G12 / 06122G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: French 1 A&B or two years of 7th & 8th grade language study (recommended grade of 75% or higher), or teacher recommendation

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B

In this semester long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for simple communication in varied applications. In the target language, they will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate simple information. In addition, students will recognize and identify relevant cultural traditions.

06123G12 / 06123G22

2 credits |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: French 2 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B

In this semester-long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for basic communication in varied applications. In the target language, students will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate basic information. They will continue to recognize and identify relevant cultural traditions.

06124G12 / 06124G22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: French 3 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

In this semester-long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for communication in more complicated applications. In the target language, they will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate more complicated information. They will continue to recognize relevant cultural traditions.

06125D11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: French 4 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B but will receive one semester grade.

5 Univ of MN College Credits Available

Students enrolling in this course have the option of taking this course for college credit in collaboration with the University of Minnesota’s College in the Schools program. Students will earn 2 EPHS credits and have the option of earning five University of Minnesota credits.

This course will follow the curriculum of 1003 University of Minnesota course in the target language. Upon successful completion of this course, students who register for the college credit will earn 5 University of Minnesota credits and an official transcript. Students should anticipate the rigor and challenge associated with a university course.  Evaluations will include written and oral exams, formal compositions, daily homework and participation. Excessive absences are not allowed per the University’s requirements.

01629D11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: French 5 / FREN 1003

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B but will receive one semester grade.

5 Univ of MN College Credits Available

Students enrolling in this course have the option of taking this course for college credit via dual enrollment with the University of Minnesota’s College in the Schools program. Students will earn 2 EPHS credits and have the option of earning five University of Minnesota credits.  

This course will follow the curriculum of 1004 University of Minnesota course in the target language.  Upon successful completion of this course, students who register for the college credit will earn 5 University of Minnesota credits and an official transcript.  Students should anticipate the rigor and challenge associated with a university course. Evaluations will include written and oral exams, formal compositions, daily homework, and participation. Excessive absences are not allowed per the University’s requirements.

06201G12 / 06201G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B

This course is designed for students with little or no background in the target language. (To strengthen skills before Level 2, this course is also recommended for students who earned less than 75% in 7th & 8th grade.) The major emphasis in this course will be on the development of listening and speaking skills. Students will also begin to read and write using basic language structures and investigate relevant cultural traditions.

06202G12 / 06202G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: German 1 A&B or two years of 7th & 8th grade language study (recommended grade of 75% or higher), or teacher recommendation

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

In this semester long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for simple communication in varied applications. In the target language, they will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate simple information. In addition, students will recognize and identify relevant cultural traditions.

06203G12 / 06203G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: German 2 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B

In this semester-long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for basic communication in varied applications. In the target language, students will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate basic information. They will continue to recognize and identify relevant cultural traditions.

06204G12 / 06204G22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: German 3 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

College Credit Available

Students enrolling in this course have the option of taking this course for college credit in collaboration with the University of Minnesota’s College in the Schools program. Students will earn 2 EPHS credits and have the option of earning five University of Minnesota credits.

This course will follow the curriculum of 1003 University of Minnesota course in the target language. Upon successful completion of this course, students who register for the college credit will earn 5 University of Minnesota credits and an official transcript. Students should anticipate the rigor and challenge associated with a university course. Evaluations will include written and oral exams, formal compositions, daily homework and participation. Excessive absences are not allowed per the University’s requirements.

06205D11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: German 4 / CIS 1003

College Credit Available

Students enrolling in this course have the option of taking this course for college credit in collaboration with the University of Minnesota’s College in the Schools program. Students will earn 2 EPHS credits and have the option of earning five University of Minnesota credits.

This course will follow the curriculum of 1004 University of Minnesota course in the target language. Upon successful completion of this course, students who register for the college credit will earn 5 University of Minnesota credits and an official transcript. Students should anticipate the rigor and challenge associated with a university course. Evaluations will include written and oral exams, formal compositions, daily homework, and participation. Excessive absences are not allowed per the University’s requirements.

06101G12 / 06101G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: None

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B

This course is designed for students with little or no background in the target language. (To strengthen skills before Level 2, this course is also recommended for students who earned less than 75% in 7th & 8th grade.) The major emphasis in this course will be on the development of listening and speaking skills. Students will also begin to read and write using basic language structures and investigate relevant cultural traditions.

06102G12 / 06102G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Spanish 1 A&B or two years of 7th & 8th grade language study (recommended grade of 75% or higher), or teacher recommendation

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

In this semester long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for simple communication in varied applications. In the target language, they will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate simple information. In addition, students will recognize and identify relevant cultural traditions.

06103G12 / 06103G22

2 credits  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Spanish 2 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

In this semester-long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for basic communication in varied applications. In the target language, students will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate basic information. They will continue to recognize and identify relevant cultural traditions.

06104G12 / 06104G22

2 credits  |  10  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B.

In this semester-long course, students will continue to learn the features of language necessary for communication in more complicated applications. In the target language, they will comprehend spoken and written information and communicate more complicated information. They will continue to recognize relevant cultural traditions.

06105D11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Spanish 4 A&B or Advanced Spanish Immersion 10 A&B

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B but will receive one semester grade.

5 Univ of MN College Credits Available

Students enrolling in this course have the option of taking this course for college credit via dual enrollment with the University of Minnesota’s “College in the Schools” program. Students will earn 2 EPHS credits and have the option of earning five University of Minnesota credits.  

This course will follow the curriculum of the University of Minnesota course, Spanish 1003, in the target language.  Upon successful completion of this course, students who register for the college credit will earn 5 University of Minnesota credits and an official transcript.   Students should anticipate the rigor and challenge associated with a university course.  Evaluations will include written and oral exams, formal compositions, daily homework and participation. Excessive absences are not allowed per the University’s requirements. 

06109D11

2 credits  |  11  |  12  |

Prerequisite: Spanish 5 / SPAN 1003

Note: Students must register for both terms A and B but will receive one semester grade.

5 Univ of MN College Credits Available

Students enrolling in this course have the option of taking this course for college credit via dual enrollment with the University of Minnesota’s College in the Schools program. Students will earn 2 EPHS credits and have the option of earning five University of Minnesota credits.

This course will follow the curriculum of Spanish 1004 University of Minnesota course in the target language.  Upon successful completion of this course, students who register for the college credit will earn 5 University of Minnesota credits and an official transcript. Students should anticipate the rigor and challenge associated with a university course. Evaluations will include written and oral exams, formal compositions, daily homework, and participation. Excessive absences are not allowed per the University’s requirements.